Kudzu: Why are we trying to eliminate it?

Posted 7/14/19

To The Editor:I was reading about how kudzu is an invasive plant species in the United States.It has been spreading in the southern U.S. at the rate of 150,000 acres annually, easily outpacing the …

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Kudzu: Why are we trying to eliminate it?

Posted

To The Editor:

I was reading about how kudzu is an invasive plant species in the United States.

It has been spreading in the southern U.S. at the rate of 150,000 acres annually, easily outpacing the use of herbicide spraying and mowing, as well as increasing the costs of these controls by $6 million annually.

This has earned kudzu the name, "The Vine That Ate The South." My source of information is Wikipedia.

I also read about the nutritional benefits of kudzu.

Due to the isoflavones in kudzu, it helps to relieve headaches, migraines, eye pain, fever, psoriasis and gastrointestinal problems, as well as to lower high blood pressure levels and thereby help to treat diabetes.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center states more research needs to be done, but the isoflavone — tectorigenin — that is found in kudzu may help to stop the replication and proliferation of cancer cells and tumors.

There are other benefits, as well. It treats, or helps, with cluster headaches, menopause and alcoholism.

But the U.S. is spending over $6 million for pesticides to rid us of kudzu?

What am I missing here? Oh, I forgot: Big Pharma!

— Roger Groot

Cleveland

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