Volunteers plant at Stuart Elementary
May 21, 2014 | 362 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Magnolia Garden Club’s May meeting was held at the home of Sue Taylor. From left are Elsie Yates, Ginger Cloud, Bess Neil, Erma Brewer, Cecile Broz, Fredricka Lawson, Annette Stanbery, Sue Taylor, Patsy Bettis, Nancy Frey, Sheila Webb and Brenda Nakdimen.
Magnolia Garden Club’s May meeting was held at the home of Sue Taylor. From left are Elsie Yates, Ginger Cloud, Bess Neil, Erma Brewer, Cecile Broz, Fredricka Lawson, Annette Stanbery, Sue Taylor, Patsy Bettis, Nancy Frey, Sheila Webb and Brenda Nakdimen.
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The April meeting of Magnolia Garden Club was held at Sue Taylor’s home. “The Sensitive Plant” by Percy Bysshe Shelley was read by Linda Cross in devotion. Fredricka Lawson conducted the business meeting. Members received a copy of the March minutes.

An update was given on progress at the George R. Stuart Elementary School’s outdoor classroom. Volunteers offered to help plant seeds with classes at the school during May. Student awards for the Woodsy Owl Poster Contest were given to member Sheila Webb to be presented to students. Members had a chance to view this year’s winning poster, and plans were made to increase Magnolia Garden Club’s entries in the coming year.

Members will participate in the Dayton flower show July 10-11. A minimum of six designs will be entered. Details for how members will be involved with this show were discussed.

Magnolia Garden Club Master Gardeners participated in a day of questions and answers on April 26 at Ace Hardware. Members of the community were able to get expert advice about plants from MGC members Taylor, Cross, Annette Stanbery, Elsie Yates, Lawson and Cecile Broz. The event was highly publicized and promoted by Ace Hardware, and proved to be a huge success.

The April program was titled, “Wildings, Their Habitat & Uses.”

This program and the following information are from National Garden Clubs Inc.: “Wildflowers — or native plants — are everywhere. There are more than 250,000 kinds of wildflowers acting as primary producers and forming healthy habitat for a variety of ecosystems.

“Wildflower gardens are becoming increasingly popular, but require greater skill and patience to grow than the average garden. Flowers recommended for greater success include hepatica, bloodroot, Dutchman’s breeches, trilliums, mayapple, columbine, white boneberry, yellow violet, adder’s tongue, Jack-in-the-pulpit, spring beauty and yellow lady’s slipper. Wildflowers prefer a sloping terrain and a habitat which resembles the natural environment of the plants. Soil preparation is critical to success.

“Wildflowers vary in their uses from food, medicinal uses, habitat, traditional weaving and decoration. Lack of habitat preservation, soil erosion and agriculture are contributing factors to the decline in native species. While some plants might be considered weeds, others could be considered exotic species by some plant lovers. Garden clubs can play a role in native plant conservation through education and awareness. Check out your local plant suppliers to start building your own native plant wildflower garden.”

A delicious meal was served in the idyllic garden setting of the Taylors’ home, following a native plant tour in her forested back acreage. Plants presented during the wildflower walk included wild geranium, obedient plant, Canada lily, white shooting star, sweet woodruff, crested dwarf iris, butter and eggs, blood root and Virginia bluebells.

Members were given a choice of plants from 18 varieties of wildflowers to take home to their gardens, a gift from MGC president Lawson. Others in attendance were Patsy Bettis, Erma Brewer, Ginger Cloud, Nancy Frey, Bess Neil, Stanbery, Broz, Yates, Brenda Nakdimen and guest Connie Green.