Music Club has evening of ‘Sonatas and Sonatinas’
Mar 16, 2014 | 484 views | 0 0 comments | 30 30 recommendations | email to a friend | print
An evening of “Sonatas and Sonatinas” was presented by Andy Hunt at the Cleveland Music Club’s monthly meeting at the Museum Center at Five Points on March 6. From left are April Itson, flute; Sandy Donegan, oboe; and George Olin, clarinet.
An evening of “Sonatas and Sonatinas” was presented by Andy Hunt at the Cleveland Music Club’s monthly meeting at the Museum Center at Five Points on March 6. From left are April Itson, flute; Sandy Donegan, oboe; and George Olin, clarinet.
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The regular monthly meeting of the Cleveland Music Club was held at the Museum Center at Five Points on March 6.

President Jean Henderson opened the meeting with welcoming remarks to members and guests. She thanked the Museum Center staff for letting the club enjoy its beautiful facility and the Steinway piano perfectly suited for an evening of “Sonatas and Sonatinas” presented by Program Director Andy Hunt.

Secretary Dortha Townsend conducted the roll call and read the minutes of the February meeting. In the absence of Treasurer Terry Barger, Townsend read his financial report.

Nominating Committee Chairman Nancy Paul and members Pat Meagher and Jeannie Sawyer had selected a slate of nominees to serve two-year terms as officers of the Cleveland Music Club starting in September.

Nominees presented at the meeting were: Ricky Donegan, president; Karen Archer, first vice president; Carolyn Lay, second vice president; Dortha Townsend, secretary; Terry Barger, treasurer; Jeannie Sawyer, historian; Sheridan Randolph, parliamentarian; and Jean Henderson, past president. Without additional nominations from the floor, all nominees were approved unanimously. They will be officially installed at the monthly meeting to be held on April 3.

Patty Hunt led members in singing the Hymn of the Month: “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing,” a traditional American melody written by the 18th-century pastor and hymnist Robert Robinson.

Andy Hunt had prepared a well-researched handout describing “Sonatas and Sonatinas,” and he shared more details about both types of music prior to starting the program. Defining a Sonata, he described it as an instrumental composition that consists of several movements. It has contrasts in tempo and key, but its movements are related to one another in theme material. The typical classical sonata begins with a lively movement — a brilliant Allegro. The second movement is slow, rhythmic and lyrical. The third movement is optional. It is usually light and graceful, and it may be in dance form or in the form of a playful piece, a Scherzo. The last movement, or the finale, is in a quick, bright tempo.

In contrast to the Sonata, the Sonatina is shorter and often lighter. It has usually three short movements that are independent sections. The first movement normally follows the sonata form of displaying and restating the musical materials, but the development section is often quite basic or is completely lacking. This sonatina form without development is also found in certain slow movements of full-fledged 18th-century sonatas and in opera overtures.

Hunt explained, also, both Sonatas and Sonatinas were composed during the Baroque, Classical and 20th-century periods, and they were written for a variety of instruments including piano, organ, harpsichord, harp, violin, viola, cello, double bass, oboe, clarinet, horn, trumpet, trombone and other instruments — even a snare drum.

Pianist Martha Lessig began the program. She played the “Andante” and “Vivace (Rondo form)” from “Sonatina, Op.36, No.4” by the Italian-born composer Muzio Clementi, 1752-1832.

George Olin, clarinet, and Lessig, piano, followed with the “Andante” and “Vivace” movements of “Sonatina” by the German composer Georg Philipp Telemann, 1681-1767.

Another piano solo was presented by Karen Archer. She played “Allegrissimo” from “Sonata, Op. 96, No.13 in D-Major” by another Italian composer, Domenico Scarlatti, 1685-1787.

Pianist Hunt played the “Allegro,” “Andante,” and “Allegro (Rondo form)” of “Sonatina, Op.20, No.1” by the German-born Danish composer Friedrich Kuhlau, 1786-1832.

The Cleveland Woodwind Trio, with guest flutist April Itson and club members Sandy Donegan, oboe, and Olin, clarinet, offered another composition by Muzio Clementi. They played the “Allegro (Rondo form)” from his “Sonatina, Op.36, No.6.

Pianist Margaret Ann Randolph closed the program with “Modéré” and “Mouvement de menuet,” from “Sonatine” by the French composer Maurice Ravel, 1875-1937.

The audience thanked Hunt and his cast of performers with roaring applause. Afterward, a spread of delicious refreshments provided by hospitality chairman Pam Edgemon and Jean Henderson was likewise much enjoyed and appreciated by everybody.