Pet and bird stories arrive from almost everywhere
Feb 23, 2014 | 728 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
HOOCH TOWNSEND is a much-loved 2-year-old pug who thoroughly enjoys his grooming sessions at Appalachian Pet Parlor.  Pugs are bred to be affectionate companion dogs who must be indoor pets. They are especially bothered by hot summer weather but are comfortable and stay happy in cool, air-conditioned homes.


MARGIE CARTER and her son, David, of ESP, have long rescued dogs and puppies in great need, and vetted and fostered them prior to their adoption into screened forever homes. Margie's and David's own beloved four-legged family members originally came to them as "rescues" but as so often happens they soon became lifetime members of their loving homes.
HOOCH TOWNSEND is a much-loved 2-year-old pug who thoroughly enjoys his grooming sessions at Appalachian Pet Parlor. Pugs are bred to be affectionate companion dogs who must be indoor pets. They are especially bothered by hot summer weather but are comfortable and stay happy in cool, air-conditioned homes. MARGIE CARTER and her son, David, of ESP, have long rescued dogs and puppies in great need, and vetted and fostered them prior to their adoption into screened forever homes. Margie's and David's own beloved four-legged family members originally came to them as "rescues" but as so often happens they soon became lifetime members of their loving homes.
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By Sue Little

Two special bird eggs laid in the nest of a lovely tree on the Berry College campus in Rome, Ga., are expected to hatch this week with two baby bald eagles making their first appearance in the world.

Clara Ruth Campbell of Cleveland has been keeping us updated with messages about this eagle family which has been watched with great interest by many both on and off the Berry campus.

“Mama and Papa Eagle took turns sitting on the eggs. Papa was seen carefully moving the eggs before sitting on them. After the snowfall began, Mama was spotted sitting on the eggs and then quickly getting back up to shake the snow off her before sitting back down. The caring parents handle their two eggs very gently,” Clara Ruth told us.

If all went as anticipated, the baby eagles should have already arrived as we are going to press so we will get an update on them for next week’s Sunday column.

The magnificent bald eagle, our national emblem, has been seriously threatened due to pesticide use, according to experts.

“Eating dead fish stranded on riverbanks and beaches has caused many bald eagles to absorb large amounts of pesticides which interferes with their calcium metabolism and results in thin-shelled and often infertile eggs,” emphasize Audubon Society staffers in another sad example of the devastating effects of pesticide use.

n On the pet scene, we have recently received a call for help from a caring gentleman who has a 14-year-old dog that he had rescued as a puppy. Now the man is going to have to “go to a nursing home and I don’t know for how long,” he told us.

He doesn’t have any family members who can care for his dog. Because the dog has never been around other dogs he isn’t sure how his dog would react with them. Sadly, this is not an unusual situation and one that pet owners need to seriously contemplate to ensure beloved pets are safe, secure and happy for life.

n Margie Carter of ESP who has long rescued and fostered puppies and dogs prior to their adoption into screened forever homes, suggested providing ESP’s vetting procedure for canines prior to taking them into our foster home care.

Here is our list which can be used by anyone adopting a new puppy or dog:

“Make a veterinary appointment to include: a general examination; DHLPP; rabies vaccination if old enough; bordetella; fecal (dewormer as needed); heartworm test (four-way); bath and grooming as needed with nail trimming included; spay/neuter if old enough with pain medications; Trifexis, heartworm preventive if heartworm test was negative.

“Ask your veterinarian what nutritious dog or puppy food you should be feeding since good health largely depends on the type of food you feed.

“Before leaving remember to get the rabies tag, the Trifexis which needs to be given once a month and any other prescribed medications. There is so much we can do to keep pets healthy and happy. Let’s spread the word,” said Margie.

n A sad call came this week from a caring lady who told of a mama dog and six puppies owned by a man in a neighboring county who lives next to one of her relatives.

She learned of this situation from her relative. She told us: “This man told my brother that he is going to keep one of the puppies but he wants to give up the others, and if he can’t find homes for them within the next week, he will kill them.”

How tragic to hear of such cruelty, and unfortunately, this man lives in a county that has no animal control or shelter.

n From Palm Beach County in Florida came a report from friends there of how their county has cut its pet euthanasia rate by one-third since 2010, two years after the county passed an ordinance requiring dogs and cats to be spayed and neutered. “This change helped,” they said, “but it is estimated that some 9,000 dogs and cats are still being euthanized here each year. The new ‘Countdown to Zero’ holds promise,” they added, “but the campaign desperately needs additional funding.”

n From West Virginia’s Dr. Scott Shalaway came news about the mystery of the snowy owl’s mass arrival from the arctic into southern states.

Conservationists realized that the tremendous upsurge in snowy owl sightings could be “a once in a lifetime experience.”

So a project began to capture and equip owls “with telemetry devices, and then monitoring them ... a costly and time-consuming project.” But with donations arriving from all over the United States and other countries, owls have been banded in many states.

To learn more about the snowy owls check out: www.project-snowstorm.org. Since snowy owls have now been seen in 25 states, we hope maybe we will get lucky enough to see some in Tennessee.

Paws up this week to: Tanya Harmon; Chris Bradford; Anna Lee Watson; Debbie Galnett; Bob and Janice Tate; and all who rescued a pet with the assurance of providing a long, wonderful life in a forever home.

Call me with your pet and wildlife stories, 728-5414, or write to: E.S.P. Inc., P.O. Box 4864, Cleveland, TN 37320.