CAG to have artist showing, book signing Saturday
by BETTIE MARLOWE Banner Staff Writer
Nov 06, 2013 | 878 views | 0 0 comments | 35 35 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Debbie Moore
Debbie Moore
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Caney Creek Village is featured in “Ripley’s Believe It or Not”as the only place in the Southeast having phone service and electricty with no roads or cars. The painting is by Sue Summers, who will be at the Cleveland Creative Arts Guild on Saturday in the “Three Woman Show,” along with Carolyn Ross Johnston. Debbie Moore, inset, who will be featured, also, at the show, is the author of “The History of Caney Creek Village.” The DVD and book were projects of Moore with her husband and son.
Caney Creek Village is featured in “Ripley’s Believe It or Not”as the only place in the Southeast having phone service and electricty with no roads or cars. The painting is by Sue Summers, who will be at the Cleveland Creative Arts Guild on Saturday in the “Three Woman Show,” along with Carolyn Ross Johnston. Debbie Moore, inset, who will be featured, also, at the show, is the author of “The History of Caney Creek Village.” The DVD and book were projects of Moore with her husband and son.
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The Cleveland Creative Arts Guild will present “Three Woman Show: Artist Showing and Signing Party” featuring Sue Summers, Debbie Moore and Carolyn Ross Johnston on Saturday from 2 to 5 p.m. (See related story on Johnston on Page 23.)

The Saturday event is an open house celebrating the creations of these gifted and talented women. Refreshments will be served and door prizes will be given. Parking is available in the rear of the building on 295 Inman St. Local Civil War maps, Confederate Voices and “The History of Caney Creek Village” — book and DVD — will be at the Saturday show, according to Dale Dotson, CAG president.

A native of Bradley County, Moore has been a teacher of Bradley County and has been a teacher in the local school system for more than 30 years. She is an avid researcher of local history and has written several family history books. Moore co-hosts a local history radio show, “Old Town Cleveland,” each Saturday at 10 a.m., on WOOP FM 99.9. Johnston will be a guest on the program on Saturday.

In 2012, Moore wrote “Confederate Voices,” a book which focuses on Confederate soldiers and families from the local region.

In 2013, Moore worked with her husband and son on a book and documentary, “The History of Caney Creek Village.” The documentary and book were about a village built in 1912 on the Ocoee River by Tennessee Power Co. The Caney Creek book and documentary won an Award of Distinction from the East Tennessee Historical Society.

Currently, the Moore family is working on a documentary about dirt track racers from the area. It will be released in the spring of 2014.

Summers has been painting with water and oil media for the past 45 years. Through study and observation, making art has helped connect her to her natural surroundings.

“In my half century of practicing visual art, I have taken brush in hand and painted a lot of canvas,” Summers said. “When I decided to begin this work (Caney Creek Village), I knew nothing of the history of this small village on the Ocoee River.” She explained the village was located about a half mile from the site of the Ocoee Power House No. 2. The homes near the river were built to house the families whose men worked on the construction of the power house. This village existed between 1912 and early 1943. The mystery of the village remains because all that is left are the foundations where houses once stood.

Summers said to gain information on the former scene, she sought out people who had gathered information concerning the area. Of tremendous help was Moore, who had written “The History of Caney Creek Village.” She also received help from Quinton Bass with the Cherokee National Forest and Doc German, who shared memories of when he lived in the village as a child.

Other information came from the books “The Old Home Place,” “Mountain Memories” and “Back to the Mountains,” written by Thurman Parish.

Ten months after beginning her project, her painting was complete — “using all my inspiration, countless tubes of acrylic paint and one 60-by-39-inch canvas.” She added, “I gave a sigh of relief.”