Time to say goodbye to DST
by GREG KAYLOR Banner Staff Writer
Nov 01, 2013 | 5234 views | 0 0 comments | 16 16 recommendations | email to a friend | print
AFTER THE REVELRY of the Downtown Halloween Block Party Thursday evening, today the official Cleveland “haint” Tall Betsy reminds everyone to remember to “Fall Back” in time. At 1:59 a.m. Sunday, local time officially reverts back to standard EST.
AFTER THE REVELRY of the Downtown Halloween Block Party Thursday evening, today the official Cleveland “haint” Tall Betsy reminds everyone to remember to “Fall Back” in time. At 1:59 a.m. Sunday, local time officially reverts back to standard EST.
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Members of Oversleepers Anonymous get a break Sunday morning ... it’s spring forward and fall back time again in Cleveland and Bradley County.

On Sunday, local residents get an extra hour of rest. At 1:59 a.m., time falls back one hour, and everyone converts back to standard time, while saying goodbye to Daylight Savings Time for the next five months.

The providence of the time change also includes an element of safety and welfare.

“Don’t forget to change those smoke alarm batteries,” according to Cleveland Fire Department Chief Steve Haun and Bradley County Fire Rescue Chief Troy Maney.

Area residents are reminded to change clocks prior to retiring Saturday evening and remove the fear of showing up at church or other destinations an hour early Sunday morning.

Daylight Savings Time was established to provide extended hours of light for labor purposes and occurs in the spring.

The U.S. Department of Energy concluded that the 2007 U.S. extension of DST saved 0.5 percent of electricity usage during the extended period, according to a 2008 Congressional report.

DST was implemented in the U.S. in 1918 and was originally called the “Standard Time Act.”

The U.S. Naval Observatory watches over the time.

“On the first Sunday in November, clocks are to be set back one hour at 2 a.m. local daylight time, which becomes 1 a.m. local standard time,” according to the USNO website.

The date was established in 2005 by Congress in the Energy Policy Act.

Also, the fire chiefs and their departments remind homeowners and apartment dwellers to not only change smoke alarm batteries at this time of the year, but to check and make sure alarms are in proper working order.

CFD and BCFR will aid in this process if needed.

Smoke alarms have been attributed to saving lives by providing that early warning of fire.

Both departments will provide new smoke alarms if needed by residents.

Contact Bradley County Fire-Rescue at 728-7067, or Cleveland Fire Department at 472-4551.