Paul Dietrich speaks at DAR meeting Nov. 2
Nov 18, 2012 | 739 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Ocoee Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution had its Nov. 2 meeting at the Elks Club. From left are hostess, Harriet Caldwell, chaplain and hostess; Paul Dietrich, speaker; Mariann Dietrich, vice regent; and Joyce Maupin, hostess.
The Ocoee Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution had its Nov. 2 meeting at the Elks Club. From left are hostess, Harriet Caldwell, chaplain and hostess; Paul Dietrich, speaker; Mariann Dietrich, vice regent; and Joyce Maupin, hostess.
slideshow
The Ocoee Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution had its Nov. 2 meeting at the Elks Club. Vice Regent Mariann Dietrich presided. She led the DAR Ritual and Harriet Caldwell gave the chaplain’s response.

Dietrich led the pledges to the American and Tennessee flags. She also led the American’s Creed, the Preamble to the Constitution and the Daughter’s Pledge to the Flag. The singing of the National Anthem followed.

Jeannine Scott gave the National Defense report in which she discussed the efforts being made to help veterans and their families as they transition to civilian life.

Maggie Evans encouraged the members to send Christmas cards to those in military service. Katie Tippens announced Ellen McReynolds has a broken leg and Linda Boyd is having health problems, also. There was no treasurer’s report since Ms. McReynolds was absent.

Jane Lucchesi gave information on the DAR magazine and read the secretary’s report prepared by Mildred Maupin.

Joy Hardin read a letter written to Nancy Ward on May 2, 1817, in which she encouraged the men to keep their land.

The speaker was Paul Dietrich. He stressed the importance of storytelling as he recounted the story his mother remembered about an ancestor who had his own train car. As a result of his mother’s recalling of the story, he became interested in researching it. His research resulted in removing any doubts regarding the story. He found it was true.

He also told a very spine-tingling story describing the bravery of his five-times great-grandmother, Mary Ramage Dillard. She was preparing a meal for some British soldiers and, as she was moving about serving the meal, she listened to the plans to overthrow a group of Colonists. Being responsible for her small child, she had to make a decision on preparation for his safety. She secured the skirt of his gown under the leg of a piece of furniture and mounted her horse that took her on a journey which permitted her to warn the Colonists that “The British were coming.” Many lives were saved because of her bravery.

It was announced that Nancy Guinn has become a full member.

Joyce Maupin and Caldwell were the hostesses. Decorations were prepared by Connie Bancroft’s third-grade class.

The meeting adjourned at 1 p.m.