WVHS rebranding image with logo unveiling Monday

By KAITLIN GEBBY
Posted 1/10/20

Walker Valley High School is unveiling its new logo on Monday after months of workshopping a fresh brand all its own. The Walker Valley logos have proven to be an issue in the past, according to …

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WVHS rebranding image with logo unveiling Monday

PRINCIPAL NAT AKIONA unveils the new logo and brand of Walker Valley High School at a Bradley County Board of Education meeting on Thursday. Akiona said previous logos were problematic due to their close resemblance with NCAA school logos.
PRINCIPAL NAT AKIONA unveils the new logo and brand of Walker Valley High School at a Bradley County Board of Education meeting on Thursday. Akiona said previous logos were problematic due to their close resemblance with NCAA school logos.
Banner photo, KAITLIN GEBBY
Posted

Walker Valley High School is unveiling its new logo on Monday after months of workshopping a fresh brand all its own. 

The Walker Valley logos have proven to be an issue in the past, according to principal Nat Akiona, who told the Bradley County Board of Education during its monthly gathering Thursday that logos, past and present, have received cease and desist letters.

 

He mentioned the “WV” that resembled West Virginia University’s logo — a Mustang nearly identical to that of the Denver Broncos and another Mustang logo about which Akiona half-joked he was waiting for a cease-and-desist letter from Boise State University. 

Starting in late October, Akiona and a committee with Walker Valley High School began the process of finding a new logo to represent the Mustangs, one that was unique and could be trademarked for the school. Working with a company in California, the committee dissected what it meant to be a Mustang and a student at Walker Valley. Akiona named themes of unity and togetherness. 

“We have a family. There is unity, and through our unity, we have power,” he said. “You're not going to find a lot of high schools where there's a pep band at a soccer match, but at Walker Valley you get that. They come out to baseball games, and football players go to band competitions and fill the stands. I mean, that's the kind of morale that I want at our school, and I think that's something that started to really coalesce in this process.” 

They came away with the tag line “One Valley,” which can be seen across the school’s Facebook page in posts teasing the reveal of the new Mustangs logo. 

Although the new logo won’t be unveiled until Monday, Akiona stated that other portions of the Walker Valley High School campus will also be renamed to fit the “wild” way of the Mustang. He specifically flagged the gold horseshoe that can be seen around the school and part of the football stadium as items that will be changed to fit the school’s new image. 

“Mustangs are wild. The horseshoe is domesticated,” he said. “You're not going to go out in Montana and find a herd of wild mustangs running around with shoes on. So we wanted to add to that end some of the references that we've used around the campus. Our football stadium being referred to as ‘The Stable’ or a section of it that we call ‘The Corral,’ that's going to change, because this committee said ... that this is not the look we want.” 

Akiona said rebranding the school with a trademarked logo all its own costs around $15,000, but said the result will be well worth it for years to come. 

“I wanted to give us our own identity, something that we could say is ours,” he said. 

 

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