This Week in History — 1943

Posted 1/6/19

1943

Cleveland is to have a new air raid warning signal, the new warning device to be a 5-horsepower siren which was tried out Wednesday afternoon. The siren is of the same type that was to be tested some three weeks ago and failed to operate when time for the test came. The failure was due to the fact that the motor had been damaged before it was received here and the device did not operate at full speed. When it was found that the first siren was defective, the manufacturing company was notified and it sent another for the trial. The new equipment was mounted on a platform on the roof of the city hall Wednesday and tested a short time after installation was completed. The siren has a deeper tone than the fire sirens here and produces a much greater volume of sound. Officials stationed at different points over the city said the sound could be heard distinctly and one woman living on the Blue Springs Road three miles from town called in to report that she had heard the sound. After the test Wednesday, civilian defense and city officials discussed the matter and decided to recommend that the city buy the device. Police Chief A.M. Trotter, Fire Chief L.F. McDaris and R.E. Haworth said they would recommend purchase of the equipment. It was pointed out that the siren would be used as an air raid warning signal at present, but when the war is over, it can be used by the fire department as the present signaling equipment is getting old and inefficient. The siren could then be used to replace the bell in the courthouse.  The signal will be bought with automatic equipment which will regulate its operation and increase efficiency over the test of Wednesday afternoon. It was disclosed that donations which will pay one-fourth the cost of the equipment and further donations from manufacturing plants are expected to reduce the amount the city will have to pay, half or less, of the total cost. Part of the money donated so far came from the prize awarded the local salvage committee when this county won third place in the scrap drive for this area. Harry Dethero, county salvage chairman, had written the Chattanooga Publishing Company, by whom the prize was given, stating that since the local civilian defense organization had helped to such a great extent in the salvage drive, he thought the prize money should be turned over to that body and used by it in its work. Another donation comes from the Cleveland Rotary Club’s Penny-A-Plane fund. The club has been using money from this fund for such purposes since it could not be applied on the purchase of a plane. The club spent more than $100 to buy the arm band insignia for members of the defense corps.

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This Week in History — 1943

Posted

1943

Cleveland is to have a new air raid warning signal, the new warning device to be a 5-horsepower siren which was tried out Wednesday afternoon.

The siren is of the same type that was to be tested some three weeks ago, and failed to operate when time for the test came. The failure was due to the fact that the motor had been damaged before it was received here, and the device did not operate at full speed. When it was found that the first siren was defective, the manufacturing company was notified and it sent another for the trial.

The new equipment was mounted on a platform on the roof of the city hall Wednesday, and tested a short time after installation was completed. The siren has a deeper tone than the fire sirens here, and produces a much greater volume of sound. Officials stationed at different points over the city sai Blue Springs Road three miles from town, called in to report that she had heard the sound. After the test Wednesday, Civilian Defense and city officials discussed the matter and decided to recommend that the city buy the device.

Police Chief A.M. Trotter, Fire Chief L.F. McDaris and R.E. Haworth said they would recommend purchase of the equipment. It was pointed out that the siren would be used as an air raid warning signal at present, but when the war is over, it can be used by the fire department as the present signaling equipment is getting old and inefficient. The siren could then be used to replace the bell in the courthouse.  

The signal will be bought with automatic equipment which will regulate its operation and increase efficiency over the test of Wednesday afternoon. It was disclosed that donations, which will pay one-fourth the cost of the equipment, and further donations from manufacturing plants are expected to reduce the amount the city will have to pay, half or less, of the total cost. Part of the money donated so far came from the prize awarded the local salvage committee when this county won third place in the scrap drive for this area.

Harry Dethero, county salvage chairman, had written the Chattanooga Publishing Company, by whom the prize was given, stating that since the local civilian defense organization had helped to such a great extent in the salvage drive, he thought the prize money should be turned over to that body and used by it in its work. Another donation comes from the Cleveland Rotary Club’s Penny-A-Plane fund. The club has been using money from this fund for such purposes, since it could not be applied on the purchase of a plane. The club spent more than $100 to buy the arm band insignia for members of the defense corps.

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George T. Milloway, 17-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John T. Milloway, recently completed an intensive course in radio at the aviation radio school at the U.S. Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Fla., it was learned here this week.

Milloway, who enlisted in the Navy June 4, received his early training at Great Lakes Illinois Naval Training station. He is now a qualified aviation radioman, and will probably be assigned to a naval air unit for further duty.

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Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Collett, Wildwood Lake, received word this week of the death of their son-in-law, Staff Sgt. Robert L. Joiner, who was killed on Christmas Day in an army car accident near Camp Blanding, Fla. Sgt. Joiner and his wife, the former Miss Hazel Collett, had visited here many times, and their friends will be sorry to learn of his death.

Sgt. Joiner had been in the army for two years and had been in camp at Ft. Jackson, S.C., until three months ago, when he was transferred to Camp Blanding. Besides his wife, he is survived by four sisters and two brothers.  Funeral services were held Wednesday at the Grissom Funeral Home in Kissimmee, Fla.

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R.D. Haney, well-known Charleston merchant who owned and operated the Co-operative store, recently sold his store and retired after 25 years in business. The veteran merchant states that he is 72 years young and that he could have continued on the job for several more years, if the work had not become so complicated due to the rationing program and other regulations.

Mr. Haney worked as a clerk for a number of years before entering business for himself. He has made his home in this county for the past 43 years. His store, which is now a well-known institution to the Charleston people, will be greatly missed, especially by the merchant’s many close friends who like to drop in for a chat. After closing the store, he rented the building to the Charleston hosiery mill.

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The Hardwick Stove Company is the first Cleveland plant to be awarded the Minute Man flag, official emblem of the war savings staff of the Treasury Department, which indicates that 90 or more per cent of the employees are buying war bonds regularly on the payroll savings plan.

The new flag may be seen waving directly under the American flag at the office entrance at the stove company. It shows the patriotism on the part of employees and their determination to insure a continuous flow of money for the successful prosecution of the war. Ninety-five percent of all employees in the plant and office were buying bonds regularly on the payroll savings plan at the end of November, and the total purchases amounted to 8 percent of the gross payroll. It is understood that the drive will be continued until the goal of 10 percent is reached.

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