This Week in History

Posted 6/10/18

1974

Motel owner Bill Johnson of the Colonial Inn on 25th Street NW was winner of a bright silver dollar for answering questions of the Chamber of Commerce’s Tourism Committee mystery tourist. Approached by Kentuckian Joe Jones, who had been selected by committee chairman Phil Wainwright as a mystery tourist, Johnson correctly told Jones, as he inquired about lodging, that Cleveland’s population is approximately 28,000 and Bradley County residents stand at 59,100. Jones and his family, including his wife Juanita, sons Steve, David, daughter Anita and mother-in-law, Mrs. Geneva Baker, were on a short vacation trip. The family had left their Verona, Ky., home Monday and visited Gatlinburg on Tuesday; Wednesday they had toured Ruby Falls, Rock City and the Chattanooga Choo Choo. The family had decided not to stay in the nearby city but to begin their return trip northward and stay in Cleveland. A silver dollar will be awarded to five local residents weekly for correct answers to the Mystery Tourist questions. The first set of questions most frequently asked by motorists are: Q: What is the temperature of Bradley County? A: Average temperature is 59.5 degrees; 85.5 per cent humidity; 51.6 inches rainfall; 2.3 inches of snow. Q: Where is the hospital? A: Bradley Memorial Hospital is located on Chambliss Avenue. Q: What is the population of Cleveland? of Bradley County? A: 1973 population figures for Cleveland are approximately 28,000. Bradley County approximate figure is 59,100. Q: Are there adequate overnight accommodations in Bradley County? A. Yes. Nearly 1,000 motel and hotel rooms are available; three are overnight camp sites for campers and trailers; over 75 restaurants and eating establishments are open in the area. Q: For what is Bradley County best known? A: It is the international headquarters of four churches and is the range capitol of the world.

This item is available in full to subscribers

This Week in History

Posted

1974

Motel owner Bill Johnson of the Colonial Inn on 25th Street N.W. was winner of a bright silver dollar for answering questions of the Chamber of Commerce’s Tourism Committee mystery tourist.

Approached by Kentuckian Joe Jones, who had been selected by committee chairman Phil Wainwright as a mystery tourist, Johnson correctly told Jones, as he inquired about lodging, that Cleveland’s population is approximately 28,000 and Bradley County residents stand at 59,100. Jones and his family, including his wife, Juanita; sons, Steve and David; daughter, Anita; and mother-in-law, Mrs. Geneva Baker, were on a short vacation trip.

The family had left their Verona, Ky., home Monday and visited Gatlinburg on Tuesday. Wednesday they had toured Ruby Falls, Rock City and the Chattanooga Choo Choo. The family had decided not to stay in the nearby city, but to begin their return trip northward and stay in Cleveland.

A silver dollar will be awarded to five local residents weekly for correct answers to the Mystery Tourist questions. The first set of questions most frequently asked by motorists are:

Q: What is the temperature of Bradley County? A: Average temperature is 59.5 degrees; 85.5 per cent humidity; 51.6 inches rainfall; 2.3 inches of snow.

Q: Where is the hospital? A: Bradley Memorial Hospital is located on Chambliss Avenue.

Q: What is the population of Cleveland? of Bradley County? A: 1973 population figures for Cleveland are approximately 28,000. Bradley County approximate figure is 59,100.

Q: Are there adequate overnight accommodations in Bradley County? A. Yes. Nearly 1,000 motel and hotel rooms are available; three are overnight camp sites for campers and trailers; over 75 restaurants and eating establishments are open in the area.

Q: For what is Bradley County best known? A: It is the international headquarters of four churches and is the range capitol of the world.

———

One of the most patriotic acts Americans of all ages can perform today is emptying the family piggy bank, according to David Newman of Cleveland Bank & Trust Company.

Newman said the nation faces a penny shortage that costs taxpayers millions because people are withholding some 30 billion pennies from circulation. This means that nearly half of the 62 billion pennies the U.S. Mint has produced in the last 15 years are in hiding, he said.

The Mint is still producing one-cent coins at the rate of 35 million a day, he added, yet there still aren’t enough pennies to go around in many areas of the nation. Newman urged families to start gathering those pennies that are hiding in pickle jars, old socks and piggy banks and bring them into the bank so the nation can get Mr. Lincoln back among the people where he belongs.

June has been declared “Penny Redemption Month” by the mint in an effort to cure this artificial shortage, Newman explained. “For every $25 worth of pennies cashed in at the bank, the U.S. Treasury is going to award an exceptional public service certificate to the individual or group responsible,” Newman said.

———

Morrison Inc., the nation’s sixth-largest diversified food service lodging operator, has announced plans for a 10,156-square-foot cafeteria in the Cleveland Mall. Plans for the 275 seat cafeteria, including a private dining room, were jointly announced by Larry Champion, representative of Arlen Shopping Venters Company and project manager for Cleveland Mall, and D.R. Cowart, president Morrison Inc.

In announcing the newest project for Morrison’s, Coward stated, “We have watched the growth of the Cleveland area with great interest, and are happy to join the business community of a progressive and friendly city. Morrison’s is not new to this area by any means, as have served many residents of the area in our fine cafeteria in the Eastgate Shopping Center in Chattanooga,” Cowart continued.

“We sincerely believe this cafeteria will serve the Cleveland community well, striving to provide good food and good service in comfortable surroundings at reasonable prices,” he added.

———

Purchase has been completed of a 10-acre tract of land chosen for the site of Cherokee Park Hospital by General Care Corporation of Nashville. According to purchase records, the land was bought from Jerome Patterson and Lorraine P. Evans for a sum of $250,000.

Construction for the hospital is expected to begin soon. General Care Corp. announced in late May that it would construct a 100-bed hospital here on a 10 acre tract that fronts Normal Chapel Road between state Highway 60 and Normal Chapel Drive.

———

Danny Davis and the Nashville Brass will be entertaining for the fifth annual Cleveland Day School Benefit Dinner-Dance to be held at the Hardwick Farms home of Mr. and Mrs. D.S. Stuart.

The occasion is an annual fundraising event for the private school sponsored by its board of directors. The group, known officially as the Sensational Danny Davis and the Nashville Brass, is headquartered in Nashville, and play primarily country classic music. The MGM recording artists’ latest production is an LPN album of Caribbean music.

Tickets, which are tax deductible, are available from any CDS member or by contacting C. Louis Patten. Danny Davis and the Nashville Brass become the fifth nationally known artists to perform at the CDS benefit, including the late Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Russ Carlyle and Snooky Lanson.

———

Sears, Roebuck and Co. will formally open its new and complete Automotive Service Center Monday, approximately one month prior to the opening of the retail store at Cleveland Mall, according to Cal Moore, store manager.

The center, located on Keith Street a few feet from the main store has the capacity to handle 10 cars simultaneously in its service bays. Manager for the new complex is Reece Lawson, former manager of Sears’ catalog store in Cleveland. Lawson said he has a staff of approximately 25 employees including mechanics, tire and battery installers, cashiers and sales personnel all professionally trained by Sears automotive experts from Atlanta and Chattanooga.

“All work is backed by Sears’ famous guarantee,” Lawson added. A 1,900-square-foot sales area contains displays of tires, batteries, and auto accessories. A complete selection of auto replacement parts also is stocked at the center for sale to the “repair it yourself enthusiast” of for installation by Sears.

According to Lawson, hours for the new center will be 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Saturday, until the main store opens. Mechanical services offered include brake service, motor tune-up, front end alignment, oil change and lubrications, and the installation of auto air conditioners and stereo sound systems.

“We are equipped to maintain emission control devices, which are especially critical on late model cars,” Lawson noted. Special features of the 11,500-square-foot building include a wheel alignment rack, hydraulic lifts in the service bays and the most modern testing equipment available.

The shiny new center promises to be particularly popular with Cleveland women who will have the opportunity to combine auto servicing requirements with some needed shopping in one stop when the full store opens.

———

McMinn County authorities are searching for a truck trailer with 20 tons of newsprint aboard. The vehicle and its load were stolen sometime Saturday from a truckstop in Riceville, where it had been parked, according to Jimmy Hester of the McMinn County Sheriff’s Department. The paper, bound for Dublin, Ga., would be worth about $4,240, according to a spokesman at Bowater Southern Paper Corp.  in Calhoun, where the ill-fated run had originated.

Hester said someone apparently pulled up in a truck, hooked to the trailer and pulled away unobserved. This marks the second time in a year that the company has lost newsprint. On March 16, the company lost 31 tons of newsprint from a trailer parked at a TVA substation near Bowater.

———

Several potential buyers for the closing Burlington Industries plant here have been in contact with the state Department of Economic and Community Development, a department official said.

“A number” of persons have made inquiries about the manufacturing plant, Industrial Development Specialist Jack Hammontree said, but the identity of the interested firms is unknown even to department officials, since queries have been made through real estate firms.

Burlington President Marion Beacham announced earlier this month the local manufacturer of woolen cloth would phase out operations over the next four-to-sixth months. Some 1,000 persons are presently employed by the firm, at an annual payroll of about $7 million.

Immediately following the closure announcement, Gov. Winfield Dunn directed state Economic and Community Development Commissioner Pat Choate to involve his department in a nationwide effort to locate another occupant for the vacated building, and specialists from the state body surveyed the plant facilities the next week.

Hammontree said the size of the manufacturing plant and the fact that Burlington will not be vacating it for about six months have limited the number of immediate purchasers, since expanding companies are frequently interested in immediate occupancy of plant facilities. But companies “will consider the plant and keep it in mind for the future,” Hammontree said, remembering it for “long range prospects.”

“The building is very large and, although it is in good repair, most people just aren’t looking for something that large,” the industrial specialist said. The persons who have been in contact with the department about the local plant should be visiting the facility within the next five to six weeks, Hammontree said.

The Burlington firm, a manufacturer of a variety of textile products through several affiliated companies, cited a worsening market for woolens and increasing costs for their manufacture in its decision to close down the local factory.

———

The telephone in the local office of First Federal Savings and Loan Association rang Friday afternoon; a neatly dressed man in a trim light blue suit paused in his conversation with several other men and picked up the instrument.

“First Federal,” he said, the deep resonant tones of his voice carrying clearly and crisply along the line, “This is Dennis James, do you have a complaint,” he continued, as he attempted to make his vocal qualities convey a gruffness his twinkling eyes belied.

The secretary whose phone the man had answered giggled. On the other end of the line a puzzled male voice said simply, “Well, no, I just called to see if my loan had gone through.” Identifying himself, the caller continued his explanation to the man in the bank… either believing in the coincidence of the name or having entirely missed the man’s introduction. “Yes, sir,” the man who had answered the telephone said, “your loan went through, but I’m afraid we will have to charge you 18 per cent interest.”

In less than 15 minutes the caller appeared in person at the bank to find out why interest rates had increased so much. After recovering from the shock, he was rewarded with an introduction to the prankster himself, television personality Dennis James.

Arriving in Cleveland earlier in the afternoon, James and a Chattanooga production crew were in the area to film a television commercial for First Federal highlighting the local branch. Traffic along Keith proceeded pretty much as normal; a few turned their heads to eye a camera crew and several businessmen on the bank’s attractive front lawn. James ran through the planned commercial several times while cameras whirred, a stop watch ticked away, and cue cards were held just below the camera’s eye for the star to read.

Watching an immediate replay of the film just shot from the rear of the production company’s panel truck, James amiably talked with bank officials, crew and a reporter. Still playful, the energetic emcee of the night time television show, “The Price is Right,” attempted to brush some dust from the large outdoor sign in front of the bank before posing in front of it for several still shots.

Inside the bank again, while the crew packed up to move on to Dayton for a final shooting assignment for the afternoon, James talked briefly about his schedule as a television performer. “I will have done 21 commercials when we finish the one in Dayton this afternoon,” he smiled.

James said he pulls a taping stint like today’s about every 30 days in some sections of the country. The commercials are generally used in rather restricted areas making them more personal. Asked about the filming of “The Price is Right”, the TV personality said they taped three shows a day; one in the afternoon and two in the evening-with three entirely new audiences. This gives the star and staff some breathing room for other commitments during the year.

“Do you ever become bored with the same show over so many weeks?” he was asked. Smiling, James was quick to answer negatively. “There are so many new people and all are so much ‘individuals’ that it really never becomes boring.”

Admitting that the audience is more or less interviewed, in mass, before the show goes before the camera, James said the show’s producers go down in to the audience and just talk to the people. “With their experience,” he said, “it’s usually easy for them to pick out those who will make good contestants and who will come across on the screen well. I’m pretty adept at it, too.” He said:

“Take Linda, for instance,” he indicated Linda Jackson whose phone he had answered earlier. “I could tell right away she was a giggler; just the kind who would go along with my joke on that poor guy. Gee, I hope he got his loan,” James smiled.

Although the grind of making television shows and commercials sometimes seems endless, most stars have time off in the summer, James said. The old joke about the children not knowing the traveling salesman father came home to him recently. His wife told his 10-year-old son that his daddy would be coming home that day and the child innocently asked, “Daddy who?”

“I swear my wife says it really happened,” James said.

Summer vacation may have to wait this year until at least late July for the Jameses. A new show, called “Name That Tune” will begin filming when the star returns to Hollywood next week. “We have a mobile home,” James explained, “and sometimes during the summer we travel around. We had planned to visit the East, the Smokies and this area and end up some in Florida, this year; but the new show cut that idea out for now. Maybe another year,” he sighed. “It’s nice country around here. I know I’ll be back,” Dennis James concluded.

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment

X

Print subscribers have FREE access to clevelandbanner.com by registering HERE

Non-subscribers have limited monthly access to local stories, but have options to subscribe to print, web or electronic editions by clicking HERE

We are sorry but you have reached the maximum number of free local stories for this month. If you have a website account here, please click HERE to log in for continued access.

If you are a print subscriber but do not have an account here, click HERE to create a website account to gain unlimited free access.

Non-subscribers may gain access by subscribing to any of our print or electronic subscriptions HERE