This Week in History

Posted 5/13/18

Mrs. Frankie Dixon, whose daughter Charlotte wrote an essay about her, has been acclaimed Mother of the Year by the Village Merchants Association. The Dixons are residents of the Michigan Avenue community. The winning essay was selected by three judges from over 13,000 entries by the grade school children of Bradley County, according to Mrs. Jeanne Turner, VMA secretary. A Michigan Avenue School student has won the contest for the past three years and in the total eight years of the contest Michigan Avenue students have claimed five wins. Sam Ledford, Michigan Avenue School principal, when asked if he had an explanation for the success of his students said, “The only one I can give is that we do stress writing in depth at our school. We are delighted to have had so many winners.” Mrs. Turner, realizing other schools might begin to lose interest in the contest, emphasized, “All schools had a great number of very good essays.” Judging, according to Mrs. Turner, was done by three objective people, all mothers and all three interested in, and having a talent for, writing. Information as to the author and school were concealed and judges saw nothing but the essays. Previous winners and schools from which the essays were submitted have been: 1963, Mrs. John Dailey, Michigan Avenue; 1964, Mrs. Otis Rushing, Mayfield; 1965, Mrs. Pat Cantrell, North Lee; 1966, Mrs. Ulyss Calfee, Michigan Avenue; 1967, Mrs. James Froula, George R. Stuart; 1968, Mrs. Charles Boggess, Michigan Avenue; and 1969, Mrs. James Roberson, Michigan Avenue. Mrs. Dixon has one other daughter and two sons, Peggy Lee, 17, Stephen Edward, 15, and John Barry, 7. She is an employee of Sanda Hosiery Mill. The family attends Tasso Baptist Church. Christine’s essay on “What My Mother Means To Me” read: “There are billions of mothers in the world, but I think mine is the best of all. To me she is the Queen of England and the First Lady of the United States. My mother is the beam that holds our family up. In our house there is no generation gap. She makes sure of that. You might think she is a computer for she knows the answer to almost everything. She’s a friend you can tell your secrets to, for yo know she will never tell. In one word she’s PERFECT.” All essays will be posted on the outside of the windows of the stores in the Village Mall Thursday through Sunday, Mrs. Turner said. They will be grouped by schools and parents may pick them up any time.

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This Week in History

Posted

1970

Mrs. Frankie Dixon, whose daughter Charlotte wrote an essay about her, has been acclaimed Mother of the Year by the Village Merchants Association.

The Dixons are residents of the Michigan Avenue community. The winning essay was selected by three judges from over 13,000 entries by  grade school children of Bradley County, according to Mrs. Jeanne Turner, VMA secretary.

A Michigan Avenue School student has won the contest for the past three years, and in the total eight years of the contest Michigan Avenue students have claimed five wins. Sam Ledford, Michigan Avenue School principal, when asked if he had an explanation for the success of his students said, “The only one I can give is that we do stress writing in depth at our school. We are delighted to have had so many winners.”

Mrs. Turner, realizing other schools might begin to lose interest in the contest, emphasized, “All schools had a great number of very good essays.” Judging, according to Mrs. Turner, was done by three objective people, all mothers and all three interested in, and having a talent for, writing.

Information as to the author and school were concealed and judges saw nothing but the essays. Previous winners and schools from which the essays were submitted have been: 1963, Mrs. John Dailey, Michigan Avenue; 1964, Mrs. Otis Rushing, Mayfield; 1965, Mrs. Pat Cantrell, North Lee; 1966, Mrs. Ulyss Calfee, Michigan Avenue; 1967, Mrs. James Froula, George R. Stuart; 1968, Mrs. Charles Boggess, Michigan Avenue; and 1969, Mrs. James Roberson, Michigan Avenue.

Mrs. Dixon has one other daughter and two sons, Peggy Lee, 17, Stephen Edward, 15, and John Barry, 7. She is an employee of Sanda Hosiery Mill. The family attends Tasso Baptist Church.

Christine’s essay on “What My Mother Means To Me” read: “There are billions of mothers in the world, but I think mine is the best of all. To me she is the Queen of England and the First Lady of the United States. My mother is the beam that holds our family up. In our house there is no generation gap. She makes sure of that. You might think she is a computer for she knows the answer to almost everything. She’s a friend you can tell your secrets to, for you know she will never tell. In one word she’s PERFECT.”

All essays will be posted on the outside of the windows of the stores in the Village Mall Thursday through Sunday, Mrs. Turner said. They will be grouped by schools and parents may pick them up any time.

———

Two air monitoring stations to measure the extent and types of pollution are to be constructed in Cleveland, a state agency has confirmed.

The units are among a total of 50 planned for Tennessee, according to V.E. Kinslow, air pollution specialist with the air pollution control division of the Tennessee Department of Public Health.

Construction should begin “within the next few days,” Kinslow said. One station will be located behind the No. 4 Fire Hall on Keith Street, Kinslow said, and the second will be situated behind the Bradley County Health Department on Spring Street.

Instruments to be included in each station include a high volume sampler, which will measure atmospheric particulate, and a paper tape sampler which will check the soiling index of the atmosphere.

“These results are generally expressed in coefficients of haze,” Kinslow added. The stations also will be equipped to test for sulfur dioxide content of the atmosphere and some of the stations in the future will do some limited fluoride gaseous sampling. The stations are being “strategically located, based on population and industrial spread across the state,” Kinslow related.

Each will be constructed on a platform between two poles with shelters for the instruments. Each station will be operated about one week of each quarter during the year. The information collected will be made available to local governmental agencies, probably on an annual basis initially, Kinslow said.

———

A men’s accessory shop featuring premium merchandise, will open Thursday, according to the new business owner Gene Ledford. “The Attic,” located on Inman Street N.W., is situated on the second floor of the building occupied by the University School of Beauty.

Introducing exclusive quality lines to the area’s fashion conscious men, the shop will feature dress shirts, neckwear, jewelry, socks, wallets and other men’s accessory items.

One of the highlights of the new business will be its selection in men’s colognes. They will carry nine different fragrances of hand-mixed colognes by experts of the Casell-Massey company who made fragrances for George Washington, Ledford said.

Ledford explained that his store would carry only high quality merchandise and would never feature close-outs, discontinued items or sales.

———

Two men were being sought this morning and one lay wounded in the hospital as results of a $24,000 armed robbery at the Gibson Discount Center just as the store was closing about 10 p.m.

The wounded man was identified by police as Lee Alvin Spilman, 34, of a Hollywood, Calif., address. Spilman was believed shot by county investigator Allen Calfee in an exchange of shots between Calfee and two bandits as the pair emerged from the store.

Williard Calfee, the store manager who estimated the loss, said he already had announced the store was closing and had locked the entrance doors when the robbery took place with “about 100 customers still in the store.” A store employee saw one armed man guarding each exit door, while the third man commandeered the cash before the three fled, the store manager said.

Authorities Sunday morning recovered cash register receipts and checks taken in the robbery, after searching a nearby motel room believed to have been used by one of the escaped suspects, Sheriff Wendell Davis said.

Spilman was listed in fair condition today at Bradley Memorial Hospital with two bullet wounds, one in his right arm and one in his back. Calfee and his partner, Deputy W.R. Barbrow, said the bandits were emerging from the front door of the discount store just as the two officers arrived in response to a holdup alarm.

“We slid up to the front door and I hollered to Allen, ‘Hey you suppose those two (men) coming out of the door had anything to do with it (the holdup),’” Barbrow recalled. “About that time Calfee yelled to watch out for a puddle of water in the parking lot so we wouldn’t skid. I locked the brakes and skidded right up to the door. That’s when the lead started flying,” Barbrow said.

Officers said the gun, a .38 caliber revolver, was recovered from the parking lot pavement near the auto of a Georgetown man. The Georgetown man’s car had been struck by one of the bullets exchanged during the confrontation, Sheriff Davis said.

Spilman was found a few minutes later lying in a field behind the store and a handful of money order blanks stolen in the robbery were found adjacent to him, police said. City and county officers and dozens of Civil Defense volunteers surrounded the large field behind the store.

Preliminary searches of the field turned up other handfuls of money order blanks, a dollar bill, parts of disguises worn by two of the three bandits and trails where the two fleeing bandits had left the store and made their way to the motel.

Civil Defense volunteers and police cordoned off the field until daylight and civil defense workers about 7:30 a.m. Sunday found clothing and other items apparently left by one of the bandits in underbrush along South Lee Highway. The recovered clothing as well as items found in the motel rooms gave no identification of the identification of the second and third suspects, Sheriff Davis said.

Officers Saturday night impounded a car which Spilman was using and had left parked at his motel room. Sunday morning the police impounded a car found parked outside the motel room where the cash register receipts from Gibson’s were found. Neither of the cars bore local license plates.

A search of Spilman’s motel room turned up about $1,200 in cash believed to have been stolen in a holdup Friday night at an A & P Supermarket on Kingston Pike in Knoxville, Sheriff Davis said. The Sheriff said city officers who staked out the motel all night became suspicious of a certain room at the motel and about 10 a.m. entered the room to search it.

The room was unoccupied but contained clothing and the items identified as having come from Gibson’s, Sheriff Davis said. Calfee said the robbery took place after a telephone cable was cut outside the rear of the store building, thus eliminating telephone service and at the same time disabling the alarm system.

When the cable was cut at 9:50 p.m. the alarm was set off and two city police officers responded to the alarm, Calfee said. At the time, Calfee said he was unable to determine what was wrong with the alarm and told officers that everything was well and that he would check into what appeared to be an alarm malfunction.

A store employee discovered the telephone system was not working and notified him, Calfee said. The store manager said he then announced the store was closing, locked the entrance doors and then started to check the alarm system and telephones.

About this time the bandits, who apparently had gone into a store rest room and donned disguises, struck, Calfee said. One of the men demanded that Pat Clayton, sporting goods department manager, hand over his money and struck Clayton, Calfee said. After getting Clayton’s money, the man went to each of the front cash registers and ordered the cashiers to “scoot their money down to the end of the counter” where he put it in a paper bag, the store manager said.

The bandit then went to the store office and ordered a woman employee there to hand over money from the opened safe, Calfee added. “The employee who saw them said all three had pistols,” Calfee said.

———

As the school year comes to an end, Tomlinson College is announcing plans to build two new buildings on its North Lee Highway campus.

“We plan to construct a men’s dormitory and college gymnasium, “President J.D. Wilkinson pointed out. The college’s board of directors has already approved plans for the building, he added.

Tomlinson moved to Cleveland’s outskirts just two years ago and hopes to break the 1969 mark in enrollment in the 1970 fall term.

“The board has approved plans for construction of the buildings, scheduled to get under way in 1971,” Wilkinson pointed out. He said that the buildings will be financed through a Cleveland bank. “The Church of God of Prophecy, who sponsors the college, includes the college President’s salary and expenses and one Biblical Education instructor’s salary in its annual budget,” Wilkinson said.

“Other than a relatively small grant, the college is self-supporting,” he added. Wilkinson pointed out that the college is slated to expand through a strip of land just south of the Cleveland Airport. The campus will then turn north on the western side of the airport, he said. The president said that he had been doing some preliminary studying into the possibility of instigating some type of flying education program at the school. “I haven’t made any concrete decisions,” Wilkinson said, “but it would add a great deal of variety to the college’s curriculum if we could instigate such a program.”

Wilkinson said when the Church of God of Prophecy donated the land to the city for the airport some years ago, it was stipulated that the church had use privileges. Wilkinson said that many of the college’s students are planning to work in various types of the ministry. “Those planning to go to the mission field would especially benefit from the flying course,” he concluded.


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