This Week in History

Posted 4/15/18

A lawsuit affecting the construction of a Church of God headquarters building in Cleveland will have to be heard in a lower court. In a decision handed down today, the Tennessee Supreme Court sent the case back to the Chancery Court for a decision. Homer Holdredge and other property owners in the Oakland states subdivision filed the suit in Chancery Court asking for a judgment on whether a city zoning amendment is legal. The amendment passed by the Board of Mayor and Commissioners makes it legal for churches to construct office buildings in residential areas. It was the latest in a series of moves in which the Church of God sought to locate a new headquarters building here after having decided at its general assembly in Dallas to remain in Cleveland. The location which would be affected by the current lawsuit is a tract of some 22 acres east of Keith Street and south of 25th Street. Following institution of the suit by Holdredge and others, the City of Cleveland demurred on the ground that the complainants’ exclusive remedy was by petition for a writ of certiorari. Following arguments at Dayton, Chancellor Glenn Woodlee sustained the city’s demurrer. The complainants appealed to the Supreme Court and the court’s ruling was announced today in an opinion handed down by Justice Chester Chatton.

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This Week in History

Posted

1966

A lawsuit affecting the construction of a Church of God headquarters building in Cleveland will have to be heard in a lower court.

In a decision handed down today, the Tennessee Supreme Court sent the case back to the Chancery Court for a decision. Homer Holdredge and other property owners in the Oakland Estates subdivision filed the suit in Chancery Court asking for a judgment on whether a city zoning amendment is legal.

The amendment passed by the Board of Mayor and Commissioners makes it legal for churches to construct office buildings in residential areas. It was the latest in a series of moves in which the Church of God sought to locate a new headquarters building here after having decided at its general assembly in Dallas to remain in Cleveland.

The location which would be affected by the current lawsuit is a tract of some 22 acres east of Keith Street and south of 25th Street. Following institution of the suit by Holdredge and others, the city of Cleveland demurred on the ground that the complainants’ exclusive remedy was by petition for a writ of certiorari.

Following arguments at Dayton, Chancellor Glenn Woodlee sustained the city’s demurrer. The complainants appealed to the Supreme Court and the court’s ruling was announced today in an opinion handed down by Justice Chester


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About 70 Bradley High School alumni and students attended a reception in the school cafeteria Friday night which capped a week long observance of the 50th anniversary.

Among the guests were former coach Jimmie Lovell, for whom the football field is named, and Blair Cunnyngham, president of the alumni association. Connie Cox, publicity director for the anniversary celebration, called the reception “a successful week of events.”

“We have enjoyed this week so much,” said Karen Kendrick, president of the sponsoring student council, “and we think the special guest speakers have enjoyed it, too. We wish it could go on longer.”

A highlight Friday was ‘"dress-up day," in which the students wore the attire of 50 years ago. Winning prizes for their costumes were Mike Kibble, first; Jane Lackey, second; Rosemary Lane, third; and Tony Rymer, fourth. The Junior Counselors were named the best represented club, with 61 percent of its members in costume.

Also Friday, Miss Kendrick presented the school with a $500 donation as an anniversary gift from the student council. The gift will go into the auditorium curtain fund. The council had presented $100 to the fund in December. Other end of the week speakers were the Rev. Sam Varnell and Franklin Haney.

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City police were alerted early today to be on the lookout for a black bear which was believed to be roaming around the 17th and Keith Street areas. Desk Sgt. Claude Feehrer received a phone call at 5:29 a.m., saying  a bear had been seen crossing Keith Street near 17th Street. Officers were dispatched to the scene, but no trace of the bear nor any signs of one  could be found.

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An ordinance annexing the proposed junior college property to the City of Cleveland passed third and final reading before the city commission Monday. The area is north of the Georgetown Road cloverleaf at Clingan Ridge, and west of Peerless Road.

The commission also rezoned the area between Sixth and Eighth Streets S.W. for residential to central business district. Harry O. Ulmer, president of the Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, formally introduced Robert Stall, new chamber executive vice president, to the commission. Ulmer said, “From all indication, Mr. Stall will be directing an active and progressive Chamber of Commerce.”

Ulmer told the commissioners that the Chamber, during the remainder of his term as president, will “direct its efforts toward total community development.” He said meetings will be arranged with merchants groups, industrial leaders and professional people to help chart a program for the Chamber.

Commissioner George R. (Bob) Taylor assured Ulmer that “the commission stands ready to serve and assist in the program.”

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Construction of the new junior college moved a step closer today as the City of Cleveland received a check for $267,652 as its share of a recent $770,000 county school bond issue.

At a meeting of the Board of Mayor and Commissioners, a resolution was adopted authorizing the city clerk to retain $125,000 of these funds to forward to the State Department of Education as the city’s share of constructing the new junior college.

The state has requested that the funds be forwarded by both the city and county by May 1 in order that a contract may be awarded next month. Bradley County has deeded 100 acres to the state on which the college will be located immediately north of the Georgetown Road interchange.

At a hearing by the city commission Monday on annexation of the junior college area by the city, only one inquiry was raised. Real estate broker Randall Fisher inquired as to the zoning of the area. Although the area will be residential, Fisher said he had plans and had already started a warehouse on property inside the annexed area.

Also, a report by Finance Commissioner George R. Taylor was heard. The city has realized $18,492.95 in interest from the investment of bond funds in short term U.S. treasury bills. He said this is more than the interest being paid on the bond monies which are being held for construction of the new Cleveland High and for water-sewer improvements.

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Bradley County Republicans go to the polls Friday to elect a slate of candidates for the August general election. A heavy turnout has been predicted since two of the major offices are contested, and all 11 seats on the county court are at issue this year.

Major interest has centered on the races for county judge, sheriff and justices of the peace, the latter being members of the county’s governing body, the Quarterly Court.

Candidates for sheriff, as listed on the ballot, are Wendell V. Davis, Jarvis Gibson, Jack Grubb, D.A. Ingram and Bill (Red) Ledford. Sheriff Sam Cannon and Squire Homer Green are contestants for the Republican nomination for county judge.

Unopposed contestants are John H. (Red) Dockery for trustee; Claude H. Climer for county court clerk; Roy C. Carroll for circuit court clerk; Levoy Hathcock for register of deeds; Jodah Lauderdale, for pike road superintendent; and Edward S. Brown for general sessions judge.

In the first district, Lee Smith is unopposed for constable. Ross Burke, Ralph York, Jewel Prince and A.L. Ownby are seeking the two seats on the county court; Ben Frazier and Walter Dixon are running for school board, with two nominees to be selected. Squire Cole Beaty and Roy Caldwell are opposed by Vernon (Ted) Lackey and Herman L. Miller for the second district’s two seats on the county court.

Carl N. Gregg, John Hughes and Roy Lee Moore are running for constable. Larry Withrow is unopposed for the nomination for school board. Squire Hubert McDaniel and J. Paul Hamilton are running for justice of the peace in the third district at large with two to be nominated and Jim Ailey is the JP candidate for the third district inside the city of Charleston.

William Stansberry is unopposed for constable. There is no school board vacancy in the third. Six candidates are seeking seats on the county court from the fourth district. They are John J. Burger, John Clayton, Herman Hayes, Owen Kile, Raymond Ledford, and Milford Miller. Clayton and Miller are presently on the court. Three are to be elected from the fourth district.

John T. Bales is unopposed as justice of the peace from the fourth district inside the City of Cleveland. Joe D. Brown, W.A. Howard and J.L. (Judd) Pritchett are contestants for two constable nominations in the fourth district. Brown and Howard are the incumbents and Pritchett is a deputy sheriff. The fourth district has no school board contest.


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