This Week in History 1-28

Posted 1/24/18

A new 500 gallon pumper fire truck, the latest addition to Cleveland Fire Department’s equipment, was in its stall early today in the new city fire hall awaiting inspection Wednesday by the state fire underwriters before being accepted by the City. The new truck consists of an American-LaFrance body on a new Ford chassis, and fully equipped cost approximately $10,000. The new pumper has 1,500 feet of new two and one half inch hose; 500 feet of one and one half inch hose; a 300 gallon booster tank with two reels of booster lines. It is capable of pumping 500 gallons of water a minute. With the arrival of the new truck this weekend Cleveland Fire Department is now equipped with four trucks, three of which are modern. The fourth one is Cleveland’s old truck, known as Truck No. One. Chief Engineer Jess Chestnutt said today the Cleveland Fire Department, with its recently added extension ladder truck and the new pumper, is now equipped to meet practically any emergency that might arise in Cleveland. The department has enough hose, he said, to lay a continuous line from the Bradley County Courthouse to Bradley Central High School.

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This Week in History 1-28

Posted

1954

A new 500-gallon pumper fire truck, the latest addition to Cleveland Fire Department’s equipment, was in it's stall early today in the new city fire hall awaiting inspection Wednesday by the state fire underwriters before being accepted by the City.

The new truck consists of an American-LaFrance body on a new Ford chassis, and fully equipped cost approximately $10,000. The new pumper has 1,500 feet of new two- and one-half-inch hose; 500 feet of one- and one-half-inch hose; a 300-gallon booster tank with two reels of booster lines.

It is capable of pumping 500 gallons of water a minute. With the arrival of the new truck this weekend the Cleveland Fire Department is now equipped with four trucks, three of which are modern. The fourth one is Cleveland’s old truck, known as Truck No. 1.

Chief Engineer Jess Chestnutt said today the Cleveland Fire Department, with its recently added extension ladder truck and the new pumper, is now equipped to meet practically any emergency that might arise in Cleveland. The department has enough hose, he said, to lay a continuous line from the Bradley County Courthouse to Bradley Central High School.

———

Deputy Sheriff Arthel Davis, injured in the right eye early Wednesday morning while making an arrest, was released from the hospital Friday afternoon and is at his home on Church Street.

Davis was struck in the right eye when a man, later booked on public drunk charge as Hoyt Blanchard, resisted arrest at Murray’s Truck Stop on Waterlevel Highway about 5:30 a.m. Wednesday.

Blanchard remained in the County jail today after failure to make bond on the public drunk charge, it was reported. He is scheduled to face charges, to be filed later, of assault.

Davis said today he is scheduled to report to Dr. Garrot’s office for further treatment Monday. Fears were expressed when he was injured that he might lose the sight of his eye. He said, however, that he was able to distinguish light and mass forms, but was unable to see sufficiently yet to distinguish details of an object.

He said he hoped to be back on the job soon. A fund is being raised to help the deputy sheriff defray the hospital expenses in connection with his injuries.

———

Bradley County rural families this week were invited to join in a nationwide Rural Home Improvement Contest featuring 101 cash prizes totaling $10,000.

Designed to encourage home improvement throughout rural America, the contest offers cash prizes that may pay winners the whole cost of their improvements. Local lumber dealers are cooperating with the sponsors of the contest, the National Lumber Manufacturing Association and Country Gentleman magazine, in advising people of their improvement projects.

Five grand prizes will be awarded nationally in the renovating or remodeling job contest. First prize is $2,500 cash; second, $1,000; and third, fourth and fifth, $500 each.

Two Tennessee families are certain to win prizes, as one $100 U.S. Savings Bond and one $50 Bond will be awarded in each state. All entries are eligible for both national and state prizes, but the winners of national prizes will not also be eligible for both national and state prizes.

Eligible to compete are permanent home improvements, which mean a remodeling, modernization, renovation, alteration, addition, rearrangement or construction which becomes a part of the home or dwelling. In awarding prizes, primary consideration will be given to these factors: convenience, utility, added living space, appearance and ingenuity.

The cost of the home improvement will not determine the winners. Any project begun in 1954 and completed before Aug. 1, 1954, is eligible for a prize.

The official entry blank, which can be secured by writing to Country Gentleman, must be mailed to the magazine before midnight, July 31, 1954. Entry blanks are free: there is no charge or fee of any kind to enter the contest.

———

Cleveland’s truck bypass is very little nearer a reality than it was five months ago when a survey of the first office in Chattanooga informed the Daily Banner today that there are “so many” different lines under consideration that the surveys have not yet been completed.

He said he could not state at this time just when state engineers would complete the survey. Announcement of truck bypass plans were announced here last August and five different routes were  under consideration. Surveys began on Aug. 28 with the announcement that engineers estimated it would take three months to complete the surveys so a route could be determined.

An unofficial poll of the preferences of Cleveland and Bradley County residents as to the bypass route disclosed that Route No. 1 to leave Lee Highway near the new city limits west of Cleveland and eliminate Ball Park Curve, passing through the west part of the city between Stuart Park Addition and the City proper, seemed to be favored by a majority of those voting.

Route No. 2 would leave Lee Highway at the top of Payne Gap Hill, proceed west of the Golf and Country Club property, just west of Stuart Park Addition, along the top of Clingan Ridge, and reenter Lee Highway at Hardwick Farms.

Route No. 3 would leave Lee Highway at the top of Payne Gap Hill, proceed much as Route No. 2, but keep west of Clingan Ridge and reenter the highway near Hardwick Farms.

Route No. 4 would leave Lee Highway west of Payne Gap Hill and proceed much the same as Routes 2 and 3.

Route No. 5 would leave Lee Highway about a mile west of Payne Gap Hill, proceed through Blythewood and the Ray Jackson farms, cross Georgetown Pike about three miles west of Cleveland and reenter the Highway near Hardwick Farms.

According to information, the rights of way for the bypass will be 80 feet wide, to be secured by the City of Cleveland and the bypass will be financed by the state and federal highway departments.

———

Mrs. Pauline Morgan Pettit, 39, wife of Charles Pettit, former McDonald postmaster, died at her home near McDonald about midnight last night after suffering a stroke.

Mrs. Pettit was rushed to a Chattanooga hospital and was pronounced dead on arrival. She was employed as a sales lady at Miller’s Department Store here.

She is survived by her husband, one son, Charles R. Pettit, and her mother, Mrs. Annie B. Morgan, all of McDonald; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Thomas of Cleveland, and Mrs. W.J. Pruett of Tampa, Fla.

The body of Mrs. Pettit will be at the home near McDonald after 8 o’clock tonight. Funeral arrangements were incomplete today and will be announced by R.J. Coulter of Chattanooga.

Mrs. Pettit was a member of McDonald Methodist Church. Her husband, prior to taking the postmastership at McDonald, was district manager of an insurance firm, maintaining his headquarters in Cleveland.

———

The creation of a new voting precinct in North Cleveland does not mean that the County’s 16th precinct, known as “The Fourth Outside,” and voters from which vote at the Bradley County Courthouse, has been abolished, but only that an additional precinct has been created for the benefit of voters living in North Cleveland in the area taken into the City of Cleveland when the city limits were extended, County Attorney Virgil Carmichael said today.

Carmichael expressed fears today that some voters would imply from Thursday’s Banner story concerning the new precinct that the “Fourth Outside” precinct and its voting place at the courthouse had been abolished. The County Attorney explained that the new precinct in North Cleveland, while it is the City’s “seventh” precinct, is the County’s 23rd precinct and will be known as the “23rd Precinct” with a voting place at Bradley Central High School.

Voters living in the Fourth Civil District, but outside the City of Cleveland, will still vote at the courthouse, Carmichael emphasized, at the regular “16th Precinct” voting place.

No voting has been done at Bradley Central High School, Carmichael said, since the State Legislature abolished the Act setting up but two civil districts in Bradley County and restored the original four civil districts.

The City of Cleveland, Carmichael said, prior to Thursday’s action by the County Court, had a total of six precincts inside the city limits-two in each warded making a total of six “inside” and 16 “outside” — a grand total of 22 precincts.

Now, he said, the County has a total of 23 precincts — 16 “outside” and seven “inside”. The City’s seventh precinct is

———

Little Charles Pope, 7-year-old first grader at McDonald School, got so busy Tuesday afternoon building a log cabin in a wooded section near the school that he didn’t know when the school bus arrived.

So Charles, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Pope of Bancroft community two miles northwest of McDonald, was a lonely little tyke when he returned to find his playmates gone, the schoolhouse locked and the playground deserted.

A whimpering little boy found his way to the nearby residence of Mr. and Mrs. David Howard where he sobbed out his name, age and his parents’ name, but just couldn’t say exactly where he lived.

Mrs. Howard said she couldn’t get very much from Charles, “because he was scared and was crying so.” “I didn’t quite know what to do,” Mrs. Howard said, “but finally decided to call the radio station at Cleveland, which broadcast that the child was lost.”

The broadcast soon brought a telephone inquiry from the boy’s aunt, who promised to send Dad after him. “You just go down this hill and over this one,” was all Mrs. Howard could learn from Charles about where he lived. It was a happy little boy who scampered off Mrs. Howard’s porch when Dad drove up.

———

Work was practically complete this week on the remodeling of the western quarters of the Harmoor Building to allow occupancy by Kirkpatricks on Feb. 5 with a departmentalized shop, millinery, bag and hosiery store.

The firm formerly had been quartered in the adjoining Hardwick Store. The front of the building has been remodeled and the walls have been finished in Sunset Rose and Sandalwood with a cream ceiling and new hard texture finish on the floors. Millinery display will be at the east side and there is a recessed display with storage beneath.

The lighting is hidden fluorescent fixtures. Plate glass mirror dressing space has also been provided. The hosiery display is at the front and behind this will be two lines of shoes. The men’s shoe department will be at the rear of the display rooms behind the millinery section. Some of the fixtures have been built here and others were secured from Melvin Roos in Atlanta.

A relief is provided from continuous shelves by recessed displays and the same type of lighted recessed displays are provided at spaced intervals over the shelves. Fluorescent lights have been provided overhead. An office has been placed at the rear of the display room and the checking out spot will be about the center of the store.

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