The power of reading

STUDENT STORIES

Skyler Stone
Posted 4/17/17

Editor’s note: This is part of a weekly series of columns written by students at Cleveland Middle School.

Me, I am a big reader.

In my elementary school, there was a club exclusively for …

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The power of reading

STUDENT STORIES

Posted

Editor’s note: This is part of a weekly series of columns written by students at Cleveland Middle School.

Me, I am a big reader.

In my elementary school, there was a club exclusively for students who read over 1 million words. I read 1 million my first year, 2 million my second, and 3 million my third. I never really stopped to think about how it was actually affecting me, and how it affected the kind of student I was.

I was that student who, instead of swinging, playing the LIFE game on a tablet (surrounded by giggling girls), or joining any sort of ballgame, would bring a book, sit down near the periphery of the playground, and just get lost in reading.

Now, especially in the classes I am in, because sometimes it can get a bit boring, I am glad that I spent my childhood this way. Reading has allowed me to escape the stressful, redundant reality of everyday life. I now have a longer time frame in which I can concentrate, and I even learn easier.

Since I have started reading, I went from average grades to getting all A’s and A+’s, simply because it is easier for me to connect the topics to each other.

In reading a book, have you ever gotten stuck with a loose end near the beginning, and as you get to know more about the story, it just all clicks together like a puzzle? It doesn't directly tell you how it is connected, just like a puzzle, but you start to understand why this character did this or why something happened. To me, this is similar to learning a new skill.

In algebra, more than any other class, we will often get taught how to do something with no real explanation behind it. I am not sure about other people, but I understand the reasons why we do the things we do in order to get that one correct answer because of my learning of these skills from an early age. It is amazing to me how a reader's train of thought differs from other people's. I wish I read more nowadays, but I still read a lot, nonetheless.

Skyler Stone is an eighth-grader at Cleveland Middle School.

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