Taylor’s Spring Park gets city’s OK

Council names birthplace site

JOYANNA LOVE Banner Senior Staff Writer
Posted 7/14/15

Taylor’s Spring Park has been chosen as the official name of the proposed area to highlight the historic location of the spring which helped bring the city of Cleveland to life.

The name, …

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Taylor’s Spring Park gets city’s OK

Council names birthplace site

Posted

Taylor’s Spring Park has been chosen as the official name of the proposed area to highlight the historic location of the spring which helped bring the city of Cleveland to life.

The name, along with a tag of “historical birthplace of the city of Cleveland,” was approved Monday by the Cleveland City Council.

The name came at the recommendation of the Taylor’s Spring committee, which had met earlier that day.

University of Tennessee Smart Communities Initiative student Jessica Taylor completed conceptual design sketches for the site. The committee is pursuing expanding the area included in the park before a final plan is developed.

The committee has already approved one change to the SCI plan. Stacked stone will be used on the wall displaying the park name. Historian Bob George emphasized the stacked stone should be real, not a manufactured replica.

The plan is for the park to be a place for people to look at the historic spring, learn about the history of the site and possibly have a picnic.

Donations for the project will be accepted through the Community Foundation of Cleveland and Bradley County.

Councilman Richard Banks said this would ensure that donations would be tax deductible. Banks said a few potential donors had already contacted him.

More information about the project can be accessed at http://taylorspring.net.

Drainage pipes in the area have been moved and are working properly, according to Cleveland Public Works director Tommy Myers.

Because of the elevation at the site, a structural engineer will be needed on the project to draw specific plans.

Banks asked how much this would cost, but Myers responded he didn’t know. The committee unanimously passed a motion to get recommendations on who could do the needed work.

Taylor’s Spring has been cited as the reason that people settled in this area. Back when Cleveland was still Cherokee country, Andrew Taylor owned the spring. Taylor was not Cherokee, but his wife was.

In recent years, the spring had been under a building on First Street, at the intersection of Spring Street. The city acquired the building and demolished it earlier this year, making highlighting the historic spot possible.

Those interested in making a donation can contact the Community Foundation at 423- 599-5880.

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