Family works

Speaking on a new year

By ROB COOMBS ID. Min. Ph.D.
Posted 1/1/17

The events of the past year have had a dramatic impact on each and every American, regardless of whether you are conservative or liberal, religious or nonreligious; black, white or Hispanic, rich or …

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Family works

Speaking on a new year

Posted

The events of the past year have had a dramatic impact on each and every American, regardless of whether you are conservative or liberal, religious or nonreligious; black, white or Hispanic, rich or poor.

These events are not only now a part of our past — they confront our present and transform our future. The beginning of our new year feels different because it is different.

For me, the events of the past year have affected me in both a negative and positive sense.

Like most others, I am reminded of the horrific destructive potentials within humans. Unlike any other living creature upon this earth, we routinely kill our own kind: babies, children, teenagers, young adults, middle adults, old adults — the weak, the helpless, the innocent.

Knowing this and understanding all too graphically our potential for devastation of life and property, there is a part of myself that feels like throwing up my arms in despair and crying, “What’s the use?” That tendency is there. But, there is a larger part of me, a MUCH larger part of me, that refuses to do so.

That part of me wants to raise my arms in celebration — celebration for the gift of life. For me, life continues to become even more precious as I age.

Thus far, I have survived while others have not. Every day is a gift. I’ve always known that, but now I’m even more likely to celebrate this reality.

One resolution I have made for this new year is to acknowledge and celebrate the gift of each day. In order to do this, I plan to focus on what’s most important. I’ve even made a list. After all, there’s no time to waste ...

(1) Life is Process: Nothing ever remains the same. Attempting to keep life as it is or save up for a better day is foolish. Life must be lived as we go along.

(2) Life is Relationships: What really matters most is not places or things, but people. There are many things I cannot afford, but most of all I can’t afford to lose friends.

(3) Life is Family: Family can be our primary source of support and love. We need our families, and our families need us. Caring for our families serves to strengthen ourselves plus the people we care most about. Good families create stable communities; stable communities create stable states, and stable states create a stable nation.

(4) Life is a Gift: Like any gift, life is given undeserved. The privilege of simply being alive is a sacred gift, one to be celebrated each and every day.

(5) Life is Hope: Even in the midst of tragedy and turmoil, there is always the opportunity for new birth. Each day brings new potential.

(6) Life is Perspective: What this world is like is deeply colored by how we view it. How we view this world determines whether we become part of the problem or part of the solution.

(7) Life is what You make it: Make it good.

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