Slaughter a farmer, carpenter, volunteer

By LARRY C. BOWERS
Posted 11/13/17

A farmer, carpenter, and American veteran was honored this Veterans Day weekend for all the services he provides to veterans in the Bradley County community.Glenn W. Slaughter was the leading …

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Slaughter a farmer, carpenter, volunteer

Posted

A farmer, carpenter, and American veteran was honored this Veterans Day weekend for all the services he provides to veterans in the Bradley County community.

Glenn W. Slaughter was the leading participant in the recent construction project of a new pavilion at Cleveland's Fort Hill Cemetery.

He has also been an important contributor to more than a dozen projects providing wheelchair ramps to veterans in the community, mainly by the Vietnam Veterans Association and the Disabled American Veterans organizations.

"They were talking about what they could do to provide these ramps, and I said I could do it, and I could build them," Slaughter said Saturday, following the annual Veterans Day program in downtown Cleveland.

Slaughter has just been honored with this year's Raymond H. Miller Patriotic Veterans Award, presented by Selection Committee Chairwoman Mary Baier.

Slaughter became the seventh veteran so honored, joining Terry Hollenback, Tommy Townsend, Billy Gray, Bill Norwood, Joe Davis and Herb Stafford.

Baier said there were five deserving nominations this year, and the committee selected Slaughter as the most deserving.

Slaughter was born and raised in Bradley County, the son of Lewis and Maggie Slaughter. He graduated from Bradley Central High School at the end of the 1969-70 school year.

He spent nine months in Vietnam before returning to Bradley County. He married his fiancee, Debra, and worked with his in-laws as a mechanic.

Glenn and Debra had four daughters, Brittnee, Betsy Arrowood, Gwendolyn and Sarah, who has passed. They also have three grandchildren, James, Maggie and Sarah Arrowood.

Slaughter is proud of his efforts to assist veterans, especially in spearheading the construction and renovation of the pavilion at the Veterans Cemetery.

His life has included more than a little history. He was born in 1949 at Cleveland's old Speck Hospital. 

In the U.S. Army in Vietnam, he worked on wheeled and track vehicles with the 76th Combat Unit, being discharged in 1974.

During his military service, he received the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal with three campaign credits, the Vietnam Campaign Medal with a 60 Device, and the M-16 Sharpshooter's Badge.

Military service also runs in his family. His father, Lewis, and brothers, Donald and John, also served.

Slaughter received an associates degree at Cleveland State Community College, and was employed over the years with a number of jobs in the community. He retired from Maytag.

He is a members of the Masons, a life member of DAV Chapter 25, a life member of VVA Chapter 596, a member of the Southeast Tennessee Veterans home Council, and was the DAV Veteran of the Year in 2016.

Debra says he is a "Jack of All Trades," and can do anything electrically, with plumbing, or carpentry. These skills have been very valuable in his efforts to assist veterans in need.

Perhaps his favorite pastime, says his wife, is spending quiet days on the farm. She said he has to feed his many animals, too numerous to count. 

He is described as humble in his volunteer service to veterans,  taking little credit for the many projects on which he participates. When presented the Raymond H. Miller Award, he said, "I appreciate this, but I don't deserve it"


Inset Quote:

"They were talking about what they could do to provide these ramps, and I said I could do it, and I could build them." — Glenn Slaughter




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