Nate Rose drops newest album

By COLBY DENTON

Posted 2/11/18

Nate Rose, a Cleveland-born rapper, has released his newest album, “EPOCH."

“EPOCH,” according to Rose, is an album comprising his life experiences.

“’Epoch,’ meaning a …

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Nate Rose drops newest album

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Nate Rose, a Cleveland-born rapper, has released his newest album, “EPOCH."

“EPOCH,” according to Rose, is an album comprising his life experiences.

“’Epoch,’ meaning a specific time period, is basically a collection of songs that surround a period of my life,” he said.

The new album features no other artists, focusing solely on Rose.

The 22-year-old Cleveland High graduate has been tirelessly working on perfecting his rap skills for years.

“People used to ask me [skeptically] if I was going to be a white rapper,” Rose said. “And I told them yes.”

Following Cleveland High, Rose attended Middle Tennessee State University where he graduated with a bachelor's degree in music business with a minor in entrepreneurship.

“When I was growing up, I was always around music. In eighth grade I started playing drums, and, through a few failed bands, I realized that I was serious about having a real career in music while others weren’t,” Rose said.

While attending Cleveland High, he was always working to improve his rap skills, listening to whatever he could get his hands on from the genre.

“My big realization that I wanted to start doing rap professionally and not just for fun was when I was listening to my iPod on the bus one morning in high school, and my own song started playing,” Rose said. “I didn’t even mean to put my song on my iPod, but it really impacted me that day to hear myself among all these famous rappers.”

From that point on, Rose faced an uphill battle against friends and family who were discouraging him and telling him he wasn't being realistic.

“People were always saying, ‘Why are you doing this? You’re not going to be able to make anything out of this,’ but I knew that I was made to entertain others and made to do this,” Rose said. “There were moments that I had doubts, obviously, but the underlying thing was that this is what I wanted to do, and nothing was going to stop me.”

Hard work and dedication are factors that matter immensely to Rose, who says that successful rappers should be honest with students who want to get into the business.

“If I were a successful rapper and I came to talk to potential future rappers, I’d tell them to quit, because it’s such a hard field to get into, and competition is incredibly stiff,” he said. “If they hear that and are still adamant about being a rapper, then they have the right mindset and can do it. If someone hears it and quits, it wasn’t for them.”

Rose believes that if someone isn’t going to charge at a career with absolute passion, then it’s not worth doing. Having handed out 8,000 business cards over the course of eight years, he’s no stranger to marketing himself.

Rose has performed in numerous venues. One of his largest shows was when he played at the University of Southern Mississippi, co-headlining with Keri Hilson for an audience of nearly 6,000.

According to Rose, his favorite shows are the smaller ones that cater to his specific fans.

“Being on a smaller stage for my fans has a completely different energy than being on a giant stage,” he said. “That’s when I can focus more on making the night fun for them, and thanking them for their support.”

His core fan base is something that Rose is focused on and seeks to grow. He said he is also incredibly grateful to his classmates and other Clevelanders who have remained loyal to him throughout his career, even when he was just starting out.

When not crafting his next rap or performing, Rose works as the social media specialist for Check Into Cash.

“EPOCH” can be purchased on all major music sites such as iTunes, Apple Music and Spotify.


Quote (Page C-1):

“When I was growing up, I was always around music. In eighth grade I started playing drums, and, through a few failed bands, I realized that I was serious about having a real career in music while others weren’t." — Nate Rose


Quote (Page C-2):

“People were always saying, ‘Why are you doing this? You’re not going to be able to make anything out of this,’ but I knew that I was made to entertain others and made to do this. There were moments that I had doubts, obviously, but the underlying thing was that this is what I wanted to do, and nothing was going to stop me.” — Nate Rose

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