Magnolia Club spies rare horticultural specimens

By COLBY DENTON Staff Writer
Posted 5/16/18

The Magnolia Garden Club met in April at the Shirley Miller Wildflower Trail in Georgia, near Pigeon Mountain. Members enjoyed a stroll along the boardwalk and held their meeting along the path, in …

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Magnolia Club spies rare horticultural specimens

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The Magnolia Garden Club met in April at the Shirley Miller Wildflower Trail in Georgia, near Pigeon Mountain. Members enjoyed a stroll along the boardwalk and held their meeting along the path, in one of the many seating areas.

President Linda Cross opened with a devotional, giving thanks for the bounties of nature and asking for protection over members. Cross then conducted the business meeting, reminding members about the Signal Mountain Flower Show on April 27 and the Ace Customer Appreciation day on May 5.

Nick Nakdimen, member Brenda’s husband, led the interpretive walk along the boardwalk, pointing out wildflowers and drawing attention to the hidden botanical treasures along the way. Members were treated to a variety of rare horticultural specimens. While the carpet of bluebells and purple Phacelia was largely past its prime, the trillium show was spectacular. The more elusive white trillium with its flower extending above the leaves and the Trillium luteum, which hugs low to the ground, were in abundance. Some of the trilliums, judging by their enormous size, might be as old as 20-25 years in maturity.

Three varieties of Solomon’s seal were on display: true Solomon’s seal, Solomon’s plume and twisted stalk, which is rarer. Foam flower, wild hyacinth, Jack-in-the-pulpit, Celandine poppy, Hepatica, spice bush, and purple phacelia were among other native plants on display at this spectacular location. While a little tricky to find, this well-maintained wildflower viewing site is well worth the drive, if you can find someone who knows the way there.

Magnolia Garden Club plans to make a visit next year in time to see the incredible display of bluebells which carpet the forest floor and surrounding hillsides. A creek flowing through the area, the canopy of trees overhead and the protection of the surrounding hills makes this bioregion a perfect place to find wildflowers and native plants. 

Other members in attendance were Elsie Yates, Fredricka Lawson, Ginger Cloud and her husband, Kenneth, and granddaughter Anne.

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