'Doing the right thing,' and its complications

Posted 10/7/18

To The Editor:Life comes at us fast and with such force at times, leaving us with decisions to make, whether hard or easy.I often find myself struggling over what to do and who will be affected. It …

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'Doing the right thing,' and its complications

Posted

To The Editor:

Life comes at us fast and with such force at times, leaving us with decisions to make, whether hard or easy.

I often find myself struggling over what to do and who will be affected. It is very important to make the right choice. This is not always an easy task.

Our mind and body would like us to make a hasty decision to end the pressure and anxiety we may be feeling from the decision. Self-interest and fear can often even further complicate the matter. Self-interest encourages us to do whatever is best for us at the time and fear causes us to question how we may hurt someone even though we are doing the right thing.

Even when we do the right thing, it does sometimes hurt someone; for example, a family member, an employee, a co-worker or even yourself.

What is right is not always clear. When we find ourselves in the position of a rock and a hard place, it can be difficult. We must begin our analysis with an open mind.

How do you know what is right? That is the million-dollar question. We must rely on our internal compass, using this compass to make the best choice possible even if it negatively affects others. This compass does not ensure that the resolution will be easy, but it will encourage you to stand more firmly behind your choice, and therefore making it manageable to follow through.

We must remember that in some situations no matter what the outcome, someone will be unhappy. Do not second-guess yourself based on this issue. Instead, remind yourself that even though it did affect someone in an unpleasant way, it was the right thing to do.

Feel secure in your choice, knowing that you used your three Cs: Courage, Character and Competence in the decision-making process. 

You may try asking yourself a few of the questions below to help influence your decision:

• What does my conscience say?

• Could it hurt anyone?

• Is it fair?

• How would I feel if someone did it to me?

• What would someone I respect advise?

Remember, there is no wrong time to do the right thing.

— Angela Wilson-Crielaard

Old Fort

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