Cleveland Music Club holds meeting at the Lessig home

Posted 9/13/17

A group of Cleveland Music Club members gathered at the home of George and Martha Lessig to enjoy the hospitality the couple has been extending year after year by hosting the first monthly meeting of …

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Cleveland Music Club holds meeting at the Lessig home

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A group of Cleveland Music Club members gathered at the home of George and Martha Lessig to enjoy the hospitality the couple has been extending year after year by hosting the first monthly meeting of the new club year. The meeting, combined with a traditional potluck dinner and music program, was held on Sept. 7.

President Rick Donegan greeted members and their guests, and thanked the Lessigs for making the club feel so welcome in their home. He also thanked hospitality committee members Dortha Townsend and Carolyn Lay for their help with the picnic arrangements and Karen Archer for directing the music program that followed the business session.

Townsend conducted the roll call followed by her reading of the minutes of the May 4 meeting held prior to the club’s summer recess. The minutes contained information about the result of the auditions for the 2017 Cleveland Music Club Scholarship.

Elijah Wyatt, a Bradley High School senior, won the scholarship by impressing the audition judges with his performances on the clarinet. Wyatt enrolled for the fall semester at Austin Peay State University, in Clarksville, where he is continuing his education for a future career in music.

Treasurer Terry Barger mentioned in his financial report the appropriate payment to Austin Peay toward Wyatt’s tuition had been made.

Donegan, who had prepared and distributed new yearbooks, asked everybody to review their book for possible omissions or errors that might need to be corrected. Referring to the scheduled programs selected for the upcoming year, he announced the program on Oct. 5, directed by Aggie Scott, will be about music by Franz Schubert and Robert Schumann. He asked members to let her know which selections they would like to contribute to the program.

Scott added it would be helpful if she could get the information as soon as possible. Jean Henderson handed out sheet music of “How Firm a Foundation,” a hymn she had selected as Hymn of the Month. She explainedthe music is from an Early American melody, but it is a great mystery as who wrote the words. John Rippon, a pastor of Carter Lane Baptist Church in London, who published “A Selection of Hymns from the Best Authors in 1787,” had included that hymn in his book. But instead of an author’s name, only the letter “K” was listed. Speculation has been that the “K” may stand for the name “Keene,” because Robert Keene was a close friend of Pastor Rippon and he led the choir of his church. Keene had helped Rippon compile the book. In later editions of the hymn book, the author’s name was listed as “Kn” and “Keen,” and “Kirkham” was credited as author in another 1844 edition.

Before leading the group in singing several verses of the hymn, accompanied by Barger on the piano, she mentionedthe title of the hymn had been originally “Exceedingly Great and Precious Promises” and she talked about the special meaning of the verses.

Program director Karen Archer asked performers to pick a personal favorite for the program she called “Pot Luck!”

Carolyn Lay sang “The Hills Are Alive” from the Rodgers & Hammerstein musical “The Sound of Music.” Barger played piano accompaniment.

Rick Donegan continued with a trumpet solo of the “Partita No. 2 in D Minor” that Johann Sebastian Bach wrote between 1717 and 1720 as a part of his compositional cycle called “Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin.”

The vocal duo of Andy and Patti Hunt, joined by Barger playing the piano, presented “Sentimental Journey,” with music by Les Brown and Ben Homer and lyrics by Bud Green. The song’s release coincided with the end of World War II in Europe and became the unofficial homecoming theme for many veterans. It also became Doris Day’s first No. 1 hit, in 1945.

Margaret Ann Randolph earned rousing applause for her challenging piano solo of the “Concert Étude No. 3 — Un sospiro” by Franz Liszt. It is the third of a set of three concert études that Liszt wrote between 1845 and 1849. The composition was published in Paris as “Trois caprices poètiques,” but Italian sub-titles were added to each of the three studies later on.

Donegan concluded the meeting with thanks to the host couple and all participants on the program.

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