Check Into Cash's first employee dies

Special to the Banner
Posted 6/3/18

Cleveland businessman and entrepreneur Allan Jones has acknowledged the passing of the very first employee of his Check Into Cash corporation.Robert "Bob" Evans, 76, known by many in the lending …

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Check Into Cash's first employee dies

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Cleveland businessman and entrepreneur Allan Jones has acknowledged the passing of the very first employee of his Check Into Cash corporation.


Robert "Bob" Evans, 76, known by many in the lending industry as "Bob Cash" passed away just over a week ago.


He was a former member of the U.S. Army National Guard, and an active member of American Legion Post 81 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2598.


He worked at various finance companies around Cleveland before settling on a career at Credit Bureau Services, where he worked as a collector and went by the alias of “Bob Cash.”


When Check Into Cash was founded by Jones, nearly 25 years ago on June 21, 1993, Evans was hired and became the company's first employee. He managed the Check Into Cash location on Keith Street, well before the company's growth to 1,300 locations in 31 states.


Jones said Check Into Cash was looking for a mascot to be their money man a few years later, and adopted the name “Bob Cash” as a way to honor Evans — their first employee. A company spokesperson said millions of advertising dollars were spent on branding the name.


Evans was affiliated with other financial endeavors, and ended his career during the past five-plus years with Tim King and his  American Trust chain of lending offices. King said at Saturday's Veterans Home Golf Tournament that Evans was forced to retire recently when he was no longer able to drive at night.


Evans was also well-known for calling in as "Bob Cash" to various shows on the WOOP 99.9 FM Radio Station.


When informed of Evans' passing, Jones said of his former colleague, : Now that Bob is gone, there will be an empty stool at the American Legion and the price of Pabst Blue Ribbon stock will probably decline. He will be greatly missed.”

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