5-17-20 - This Week in History

Posted 5/16/20

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY – 1950

CITY STREETS OVERFLOW FOR ARMED FORCES DAY

Downtown streets overflowed today, as Clevelanders turned out “en masse” for observance of Armed Forces Day, first joint unification effort of the Army, Navy, and Airforce.  Downtown merchants and business houses placed the American flag on sidewalks fronting their shops and inside their stores.  An open house program “designed to give the civilian a view of latest weapons,” was held in the National Guard Armory from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.  In early Armed Forces Day program, local National Guard companies paraded its mobile units through the center of the city while residents jammed the sidewalks.  The Cleveland National Guard and Recruiting Service exhibited various light and heavy weapons and armament on Court House Square, which drew hundreds of spectators throughout the day.  Business paused momentarily when a flight of eight F-47 Army planes, piloted by National Guard airmen, buzzed the city just before noon.  Climax of the local Armed Forced Day program was scheduled tonight at 9 p.m., when the American Legion, in cooperation with the Chamber of Commerce and other city organizations, will present a fireworks display at Legion Ball Park.  The fireworks exhibit, embracing 38 aerial units and other Fourth of July-like “crackers and bombs”, will last approximately 30 minutes.  An exhibition Legion League softball game between Oak Ridge and Cleveland Merchants will precede the display at 8 p.m.  John M. Dunlap, chairman of Armed Forces Day here, today expressed his “appreciation for cooperation of the city’s civic clubs, fraternal organizations, National Guard, American Legion merchants and others who have helped make Armed Forces Week a success.” 

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5-17-20 - This Week in History

Posted

1950

City streets overflow for Armed Forces Day

Downtown streets overflowed today, as Clevelanders turned out “en masse” for observance of Armed Forces Day, first joint unification effort of the Army, Navy, and Air Force.  Downtown merchants and business houses placed the American flags on sidewalks fronting their shops and inside their stores.  An open house program “designed to give the civilian a view of latest weapons,” was held in the National Guard Armory from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.  

In an early Armed Forces Day program, local National Guard companies paraded mobile units through the center of the city, while residents jammed the sidewalks.  The Cleveland National Guard and Recruiting Service exhibited various light and heavy weapons and armament on Court House Square, which drew hundreds of spectators throughout the day.  

Business paused momentarily when a flight of eight F-47 Army planes, piloted by National Guard airmen, buzzed the city just before noon.  Climax of the local Armed Forced Day program was scheduled at night, when the American Legion, in cooperation with the Chamber of Commerce and other city organizations, will present a fireworks display at Legion Ball Park.  

The fireworks exhibit, embracing 38 aerial units and other Fourth of July-like “crackers and bombs,” was approximately 30 minutes.  An exhibition Legion League softball game between Oak Ridge and Cleveland Merchants preceded the display at 8 p.m.  

John M. Dunlap, chairman of Armed Forces Day,  expressed his “appreciation for cooperation of the city’s civic clubs, fraternal organizations, National Guard, American Legion merchants and others who have helped make Armed Forces Week a success.” 

Hardwick Stove idles employees because of rail strike

An estimated 90 percent of Hardwick Stove Co. employees were idled today when the plant was forced to cease operations because of the railroad strike.  

A.D. Walden, plant official, said the shutdown will eventually affect “all our workers.”  

Hardwick’s is one of the city’s “big three” stove foundries and the only one so far to shut down.  

Officials at Brown Stove Works, Dixie Foundry and Co-operative Foundry Co. said their plants will continue operating at present, but the two larger plants may be forced to shut down in two weeks, if the rail strike continues. 

A.W. Herndon, Co-operative Foundry official, said that although his plant “has felt” the strike, there is no immediate prospect of curtailed operations.  

“We have on hand a supply of raw materials sufficient to last 30 days,” Herndon said, “and therefore the strike will not affect our operation from that standpoint for another month.”  

It was a different story at Brown’s and Dixie's plants.  

“I believe we can continue operating two more weeks with our present supply of raw materials,” said Kenneth Brown, vice president of the Brown firm, “but after that, I’d be afraid to say what we may be forced to do.  We are just operating now on a day-to-day basis, hoping the strike will be settled.” 

 S.B. Rymer Jr., Dixie executive, said no changes in his plant’s operation has occurred “so far” and that he has on hand sufficient materials for another week’s operation.  

While these industries ship part of their products by truck, they must depend upon the railroad for transportation of raw materials, according to officials. 

Not only were the city’s stove manufacturing concerns feeling effects of the strike, but other types of industry as well.  

Oscar Stonecipher plant superintendent at Cleveland Chair Co., said his plant will be “forced to cease operations in the next two to three days unless relief is forthcoming.” The company ships almost exclusively by rail, he said, and obtains raw materials by rail. 

 Stonecipher said his plant would have shut down today “if we had not received a carload of materials.” 

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