2-9-20 - This Week in History

Posted 2/8/20

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY 1936

100 YEARS AGO TODAY, BRADLEY COUNTY WAS CREATED BY ACT

One hundred years ago today, February 10, 1836, the Tennessee Legislature passed on third and final reading a measure creating a new county out of the lands then recently purchased from the Cherokee Indians, known as the Ocoee Purchase.  However, the county was not legally set up until the following June 1, 1836, as the birthday of Bradley county and plans are being formulated to hold the one hundredth anniversary celebration here the week of June 1 next.  The Bradley County Court took cognizance of the anniversary at the January session and it is hoped that a dignified anniversary celebration can be staged early this summer.  The bill creating Bradley county was introduced in the House by Elijah Hurst, representative from McMinn and Monroe counties, and in the senate by James H. Reagan of McMinn county.  The first name proposed for the new county was Foster, for the speaker of the house, subsequently United States senator and an unsuccessful candidate for governor.  The bill was amended by striking out the word Foster and substituting therefor Rutledge, in honor of Edward Rutledge, signer of the Declaration of Independence from South Carolina, who had become a citizen of Nashville.  The bill was again amended by striking out the name Rutledge and substituting therefor Bradley.  That part of the bill in reference to the name as finally passed, reads: “The county, when organized, shall be called Bradley in honor of and to perpetuate the name of Col. Edward Bradley, late of Shelby county, Tennessee.”  

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2-9-20 - This Week in History

Posted

1936

 
One hundred years ago, Feb. 10, 1836, the Tennessee Legislature passed on third and final reading a measure creating a new county out of the lands then recently purchased from the Cherokee Indians, known as the Ocoee Purchase.  

However, the county was not legally set up until the following June 1, 1836, as the birthday of Bradley county and plans are being formulated to hold the 100th anniversary celebration here the week of June 1.  The Bradley County Court took cognizance of the anniversary at the January session and it is hoped that a dignified anniversary celebration can be staged early this summer.  

The bill creating Bradley County was introduced in the House by Elijah Hurst, representative from McMinn and Monroe counties, and in the senate by James H. Reagan of McMinn county.  The first name proposed for the new county was Foster, for the speaker of the house, subsequently United States senator and an unsuccessful candidate for governor.  The bill was amended by striking out the word Foster and substituting Rutledge, in honor of Edward Rutledge, signer of the Declaration of Independence from South Carolina, who had become a citizen of Nashville.  

The bill was again amended by striking out the name Rutledge and substituting  Bradley.  That part of the bill in reference to the name as finally passed, reads: “The county, when organized, shall be called Bradley in honor of and to perpetuate the name of Col. Edward Bradley, late of Shelby county, Tennessee.”  


Plans were formulated here Friday for the erection of four Red Cross first aid stations to be placed at strategic points on the principal highways leading into the city, and residents lying continuous to the stations established will be trained in administering first aid.  

The sites for the stations are to be selected within the next week according to plans formulated at the committee meeting under direction of J.B. Dunne, Red Cross field representative.  Bradley county is one of 12 counties in Tennessee selected by the National Red Cross in their experiment to reduce highway fatalities and the number of permanently injured, and it is the plan of the national organization to have 15,000 stations, similar to the ones to be erected here, in operation by the end of the year.  

“Of the 36,000 persons killed in highway accidents, about 20 to 25 percent could have been saved if given first aid shortly after the accident and that is the end toward which we are working,” Mr. Dunne said.  

Henry Reeves, chairman of the local highway accident prevention committee, is to contact highway patrolmen and seek their advice as to the most dangerous places on the highways leading into Cleveland, that is the points at which the most accidents occur, before definitely deciding on the location of the stations. 

 At present, it is planned to locate one station on Lee Highway between Cleveland and Charleston, about five miles north of the city.  Another on the Lee Highway between Cleveland and the Hamilton county line, likely near McDonald, and the other two stations would be located on the Dalton highway and the Waterlevel highway.  

Plans were made for classes in first aid to be conducted by Dr. Vance Bell, to instruct the attendants of the first aid stations and all others interested.  

Cleveland’s volunteer firemen and peace officers of the county will be invited to attend the classes.  It was pointed out that the attendants of the first aid stations serve without pay and can make no charge for their service but will be furnished the necessary equipment for the operation of the station by the local chapter.  Each station will be equipped with bandages, iodine, splints, blankets, etc.  Each station will be plainly marked by a sign reading “First Aid Station, American Red Cross.”   It is believed that the sign will also serve as a warning to speeders.  

When questioned why he didn’t have his birth certificate, the late Will Rogers once said, “Well, out in the country where I come from, it’s a pretty generally accepted fact that a guy is born when you stand looking at him in the face.”  

However, birth certificates are valuable credentials in our present-day life and some 170 birth certificates of Cleveland and Bradley county children lay in the Bradley county health office that parents should call for at once.  Although the child may not need his or her birth certificate at the present, sometime in the future he or she will more than likely have a very definite need for this credential and may encounter considerable trouble in obtaining it, health officials pointed out.  

“No more high-power beer, no more ale and no more wines are to be sold legally in beer parlors and cafes of this city,” Chief of Police Arthur Trotter announced today after a “showdown” conference with beer distributors of the section.  

The distributors admitted that their ales and wines exceeded the five per cent of alcohol per volume allowed by the city charter, and promised not to bring anymore in here while the existing laws were in effect.  

“Most of the beer brought in here by out-of-town distributors bears labels which are intended to mislead the buying public as to the alcohol content,” Chief Trotter said, pointing out that such brands bear labels which read thus: “Not more than 12 per cent alcohol.”  The police chief said that these labels did not state the minimum amount of alcohol contained in the beverage and that it was a direct psychological move on the part of the brewers to get business for their little-known brands by misrepresenting their product.  

Neither of the local distributors are handling brands bearing such misleading labels.  The brands handled by local distributors state both the minimum and maximum percentages and the maximum is within the city law, Chief Trotter said.  

He has set midnight Sunday as the deadline for beer parlors and café owners to dispose of their stock above the legal percentage.  

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