11-3-19 - This Week in History — 1914

Posted 11/2/19

1914

Another Jail Delivery

Second Within Week Occurred Wed. Night, Four prisoners Escaped

Tore Hold in Jail Wall

Sometime Wednesday night four prisoners made their escape from the county jail and are still at large. The men who escaped are Woody, Burton, Wells and Meets. Woody and Burton are two of the band of thieves that was apprehended for breaking into several business houses some days since. Wells was recently picked up and is believed to have been a notorious criminal, wanted somewhere badly. When arrested he had on his person two dangerous revolvers, a pair of brass knucks, a bottle of chloroform and other accessories that might be considered necessary to a first class crook. Meets was arrested last Saturday on a charge of selling liquor, and was in for a fine of $50 and costs. The men made their escape by taking advantage of a series of circumstances favorable to their plan. It appears that they were left in the cage of the second story of the jail. The iron floor about the toilet located on this floor had rusted out leaving a long narrow semicircular hole communicating with the cage below. Jailer Rymer has had this hole patched since he took charge of the jail by bolting three bars of iron across it. The bolts holding these irons, however, were arranged with the taps or nuts above. It appears that the prisoners found it comparatively easy to loose one of these nut and slip the bar aside. Another circumstance which they somehow seem to have divined is the fact that the door of the cage below was left unlocked on this particular night. The jailer is certain that someone left the door unlocked for he found it wide open this morning when he went into the back part of the building. The men having dropped through the hole above referred to opened this unlocked door and then found themselves confronted with nothing more substantial than the outer brick wall of the jail. This they easily pierced by means of a heavy case weight, apparently a window weight, which they somehow found in the building. An opening was made in the wall large enough for almost any man to crawl out and they four men went through to liberty. Other prisoners were confined within the same cage, but claim that they knew nothing of the escape. Those who have seen the jail since the escape are confident that the men were assisted in getting out, but as to the source from which they got assistance, all is conjecture. It is said that the nut was evidently removed from the bolt by some sort of wrench. It is claimed by some also that the men must have had some sort of sharp instrument with which to pick a hole into the brick wall. The man Wells is believed to have been the leader in the escapade. He was something since picked off a train and the fact that he was well armed and also well provided with money, leads some to believe that he was a train robber.

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11-3-19 - This Week in History — 1914

Posted

1914


Another jail delivery ; 4 prisoners escape — tore hole in wall


Sometime Wednesday night, four prisoners made their escape from the county jail and are still at large. The men who escaped are Woody, Burton, Wells and Meets. Woody and Burton are two of the band of thieves apprehended for breaking into several business houses some days since. Wells was recently picked up and is believed to have been a notorious criminal, wanted somewhere badly. When arrested he had on his person two dangerous revolvers, a pair of brass knucks, a bottle of chloroform and other accessories that might be considered necessary to a first-class crook. Meets was arrested last Saturday on a charge of selling liquor, and was in for a fine of $50 and costs.

The men made their escape by taking advantage of a series of circumstances favorable to their plan. It appears  they were left in the cage of the second story of the jail. The iron floor about the toilet located on this floor had rusted out leaving a long narrow semicircular hole communicating with the cage below. Jailer Rymer has had this hole patched since he took charge of the jail by bolting three bars of iron across it.

The bolts holding these irons, however, were arranged with the taps or nuts above. It appears the prisoners found it comparatively easy to loose one of these nut and slip the bar aside. Another circumstance which they somehow seem to have divined is the fact that the door of the cage below was left unlocked on this particular night.

The jailer is certain that someone left the door unlocked for he found it wide open this morning when he went into the back part of the building. The men having dropped through the hole above referred to opened this unlocked door and then found themselves confronted with nothing more substantial than the outer brick wall of the jail.

This they easily pierced by means of a heavy case weight, apparently a window weight, which they somehow found in the building. An opening was made in the wall large enough for almost any man to crawl out and the four men went through to liberty. Other prisoners were confined within the same cage, but claim that they knew nothing of the escape. Those who have seen the jail since the escape are confident the men were assisted in getting out, but as to the source from which they got assistance, all is conjecture.

It is said  the nut was evidently removed from the bolt by some sort of wrench. It is claimed by some also that the men must have had some sort of sharp instrument with which to pick a hole into the brick wall. The man Wells is believed to have been the leader in the escapade. He was picked off a train and the fact that he was well armed, and also well provided with money, leads some to believe that he was a train robber.

 

Halloween pranks

Halloween passed with fewer pranks apparently than usual. Some few gates were removed and some other mischief of an innocent nature was indulged in. The Halloween spooks seems to have a considerable faculty for humor.

On the front door of the store of one of Cleveland strongest prohibitionists occurred the sign “Moonshine and Bootleggins” for sale. In another section of the state one young man lost his life while engaged in playing a Halloween prank. It is gratifying to note that nothing of that kind occurred in this  area.

 

Churches unite — Inman Street,  Central congregations

The negotiations for uniting Inman Street and Central Avenue  Baptist churches of Cleveland in one body, which had been in progress for some time, were completed last week and on Sunday morning the two bodies met together in the Central Avenue building and worshiped in that building.

Hereafter all services will be held there and the church will be known as the First Baptist Church of Cleveland.

About 17 years ago there was division in the Baptist body here, the difficulty arouse over a trivial matter, but the breech grew wider and wider, until part of the congregation withdrew and built the edifice in which the two congregations now worship. In recent years the congregation of the church has been invaded by other denominations, the Church of God, chiefly, and it had became comparatively weak. Some months ago the Inman Street people bought a fine lot at the corner of Church and Central Avenue in preparatory to building thereon a modern church. The new site is within less than a block from the Central Avenue building.

Doubtless the weakness of the one church and the proximity to it of the new site conspired to effect the union. Last Sunday morning, all the preliminaries having arranged, the congregation of the Inman Street church held a short farewell service. They formed a column and marched to the other edifice where the two bodies were united by the adoption of suitable resolutions, and where they worshipped together as one body for the first time in all these years.

 

New janitor at courthouse is hustler

R.L. Maupin, who was recently employed to take charge of the courthouse and lawn, is giving good service, so say the county officers in charge. Maupin is on the job early and late, and keeps things cleaned up. When not engaged in the interior of the building, he is on the lawn raking and burning leaves, paper and other trash that accumulates.

In this connection, it may be said that there is a considerable sentiment against the strowing of circulars and posters on the streets. These accumulate in the gutter and clog culverts, and otherwise obstruct the streets. Recently the interior of the courthouse has been considerably improved. The rooms of some of the officials have been repaired, calcimined and otherwise beautified. Half of the expense of this work has been born by the officials themselves and the other has been met by the county under the direction of John H. Still. All the floors have been oiled at the county’s expense. All this is very commendable. Every county building ought to be a model of cleanliness and sanitation.


 Centenary College girls help

The young ladies of Centenary College have formed among themselves a Belgium relief society. These young ladies have taken it in hand to minister especially to the destitute children many of whom are bereft of parents as well as of all else.

The young ladies are preparing Christmas boxes containing dressed dolls, toys and articles of practical value of whatever description can be gotten together. Doubtless, many a sad little heart will be made glad and many tearful eyes made joyful by these gifts which to us may seem insignificant.


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