City offers to extend Animal Control plan
by DAVID DAVIS, Managing Editor
Mar 28, 2013 | 947 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Animal Shelter
Bradley County and the city of Cleveland are negotiating a new animal control contract. Options range from extending the current agreement to discontinuing calls outside the city limits. Banner photo, DAVID DAVIS
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The Cleveland City Council earlier this week said it is willing to continue providing all of Bradley County with an animal shelter and provide for the needs of animals needing protection and adoption, and will continue to move toward a no-kill city.

At-Large Councilman Richard Banks made a motion Monday to extend an agreement to Bradley County to continue the animal control contract under existing terms for a three-year period. The motion was approved by a vote of 8-0.

The proposed agreement comes after Bradley County Mayor D. Gary Davis sent a letter to City Manager Janice Casteel informing her the county did not wish to continue the contract under the same conditions. It was, however, willing to renegotiate for terms more equitable to both sides. The Council rejected the county’s offer in favor of extending the current agreement.

In the past calendar year, 1,687 animals came from the city and 3,114 animals came from the county for a total of 4,801. Animal control officers responded to a total of 7,888 calls, of which 3,867 were in the city and 4,021 in the county. Overall, 56.2 percent of the animals and calls came from the city.

The city’s proposal is based on the fiscal year 2014 operating budget of $649,007 plus depreciation costs raises the amount to $663,174. After sales, fees and fines of $31,433 the net operating cost is estimated at $631,741. The county’s share would be 56.2 percent or $355,038.

The county proposal is based on the previous year’s operating budget of $548,043. Under that proposal, the county share would be $298,455.

The difference between the two proposals is $56,583 less the county would pay.

In the past calendar year, 1,687 animals came from the city and 3,114 animals came from the county for a total of 4,801. Animal control officers responded to a total of 7,888 calls of which 3,867 were in the city and 4,021 in the county. Overall, 56.2 percent of the animals and calls came from the city.