Church members in circle of prayer look to new year
by BRIAN GRAVES Banner Staff Writer
Jan 01, 2014 | 1018 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Members of Broad Street United Methodist Church walk around the block in prayer for the church and the community Tuesday afternoon.
Banner photo, BRIAN GRAVES
Members of Broad Street United Methodist Church walk around the block in prayer for the church and the community Tuesday afternoon. Banner photo, BRIAN GRAVES
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Members of Broad Street United Methodist Church took time out on the last day of 2013 to pray for God’s blessings during the new one.

Co-organizers Ann McCarley and Yvette Mehling brought the event together as a way of being unified in support of the church and the community.

“The Scripture says, ‘Where two or three are gathered in my name, I am there.’ So, there’s no formality. Ann and I talked and decided we wanted to do it, and if others wanted to join us they were welcome to join us.”

Mehling said the goal was to walk around the block where the church is located while in prayer.

“What a wonderful opportunity to pray for our church and for all the people who walk through these doors,” Mehling said. “I was thinking that includes delivery people, people coming to ask for assistance; that [includes] our church family, and people who are coming here for the first time.”

She said walking around the block praying for all of those she mentioned was “a blessing.”

“We’re praying for our own families. We’re praying for our friends. We’re praying for people we may not know, but hope to get to know,” Mehling said.

She also encouraged participants to take time to lay their hands on the doors and windows.

“What an opportunity to pray for the rooms [in this church] and those who come in and out of them,” Mehling said.

She said the idea came from reading the book “The Circlemaker,” by Mark Batterson, who is the lead pastor of the National Community Church in Washington, D.C.

“Drawing prayer circles around our dreams isn’t just a mechanism whereby we accomplish great things for God,” Batterson wrote. “It’s a mechanism whereby God accomplishes great things in us.”